Training Warriors for the 21st Century

Training Warriors for the 21st Century
Joong Do Kwan Traditional Taekwondo cross training with Kidokwan Perth

5 Nov 2014

Dan-gun: Twin Outer Forearm Block as Uppercut (Step 9 & 11)


Uppercut with back hand held up for cover

Uppercut to body with back hand held high

Twin Outer Forearm Block - a dead ringer

An uppercut is an excellent versatile strike that comes from underneath, between arms and can find a target in tight situations where a straight punch might not land. It's a fairly easy strike - so there is absolutely no logical reason why I should wait until Kwang-gae Step 2 & 3 to learn an 'upset' punch which is more or less related to the uppercut, but which strikes towards the body not upwards toward the head.

Kwang-gae's Upset Punch - a Little Too Late?
Uppercuts are done close range, with body torque allowing you to find holes through the opponent's defences in order for the punch to land. Entering close range means to put frontal pressure on the opponent using gap closing tactics.

Most cross-training nowadays will help you achieve a decent punch. Hand mitts are held facing downward and toward you and you strike upward. To improve on the strike you should try not to let the arm move freely from the shoulder, but to support the striking motion with body torque and leg expansion.

The Twin Outer Forearm block done as strike is not a boxing tactic. The raised arm is there as a cover and as a grab-control. If the person punches you and you attempt to do this, your opponent will retract his arm and you will be dragged forward AND your strike will be unsuccessful. If you however attempt to strike the opponent with your back hand, the opponent will seek to block or jam your strike. When he does this then you punch under his arm toward his head.

The back hand indicates that you should explore ways to control an extended arm - this does not mean the opponent will give you his arm willingly.

The turn of pattern Dan-gun indicates that you are best using this tactic when you approach the opponent from the side - rather than front on.

--
Colin Wee
Principal, Joong Do Kwan (Perth)
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4 comments:

Mir said...

Love the comparison pictures..

Udy Regan said...

I remember pulling some boxing books out from my mobile self storage pod a while back. Didn't understand anything at all. Best way to learn about boxing is to get in the ring!

Udy Regan said...

I remember pulling some boxing books out from my mobile self storage pod a while back. Didn't understand anything at all. Best way to learn about boxing is to get in the ring!

Colin Wee said...

Udy - sorry this response is a little late. But you are spot on. :-) It's hard to follow a 1-2-3 book on martial arts! Cheers, Colin