Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

28 Oct 2009

Quick Thinking by Our Resident 'Hot Mama' Apprehends Crims

Hikaru Dojo, Perth, congratulates one of our female students 7th kyu who showed some quick thinking today and took the right course of action by calling the cops. Read the following note she sent to the Principal - name and school omitted for privacy. Good on you!

***begin***
9:40am, Wednesday the 28th of October 2009.

Dear Parents,

Hi, my name is and I am one of the parents here at School. I would like to relate an incident to you that happened to me this morning in the car park directly across from the school.

I was on my way back down to the car with my mother and toddler when a beat up looking vehicle parked 2 spaces down from us. Two men, one young and the other older, got out of the car and walked over to the little hut just across from where they had parked.

They took note of us and made some very unsavoury remarks such as “Hot Mama”, which made my mother and I very uncomfortable. I quickly strapped my baby into the car and urged my mother to get into the car as quickly as possible as they were taking (particularly the older man) more than a casual interest in us. I got into the car and reversed out of the parking lot, before driving off I made note of the drivers licence plate. At this point the older man advanced towards us in a menacing fashion and was obviously very keen to remove us as quickly as possible from the car park. He continued to look at us until we were well and truly away from the car park.

They were clearly dangerous and I was very concerned for the safety of my mother and child.

At this point I decided to report the incident to the Cottesloe Police station. By reporting this incident to the police within minutes of it occurring, the police officers were able to dispatch a squad car immediately and the two men were apprehended and arrested in the act of committing a crime. The police officers were very grateful for the information that led to them being able to make this arrest and would like to urge anyone seeing any suspicious behaviour to report it as quickly as possible. If you are not able to make it to a Police Station please ring 131 444.

***end***

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

26 Oct 2009

Taekwondo Side Kick Retraction

The prevailing wisdom with kicks is that for most kicks (especially the basic traditional kicks) once extended, the leg is recoiled back along the same path. This means that you don't send the foot out and then change angle in mid-air. This of course can be done, I have myself done this in sparring for kicks that were not always fully committed in order to chamber the kick mid air and send the striking leg out again. However, this is not the same for do-or-die basic kicks. With 100% power, the torque and the vibrational force if not dissipated correctly, recoils back along the skeletal structure. It typically comes back for the first major joint - your knee, but the vibration is equally happy going for your hip, neck or your support knee. Last Sunday I was practicing side kicks with my 6th kyu, and I was noticing that the kick did not seem to be coming back along the same path. It seemed more or less correct but right in the end, it looked flappy and 'wrong.' After some experimentation, we came to the conclusion that for that specific side thrust kick (the lower limb rises towards the point of impact), the kick is pushed out with the large muscles of the leg - gluts and hamstrings. It's hard to control the retraction or recoil, and some people would relax the hip and retract it using the smaller quads and hip extensor muscles. This kick requires leg muscle retraction to power the leg back to the chambered position next to the support leg. This is the best way to return your body to a 'ready' position, or to allow you to re-engage the use of your hands to counter.

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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

25 Oct 2009

Taekwondo One Step Video

Taekwondo One Step Sparring Curriculum from American Karate and Taekwondo Organization (of whom I'm affiliated with) uses six core one step techniques from the Nam Seo Kwan Taekwondo tradition. One step sparring allows us to gain insight into distancing and timing.

In addition,one steps allow students to practice bringing two hands up and placed between them and their opponents. It also allows students to strike 'from where their hands are,' and not necessarily start the strike from a hip chambered location.

The best thing with one steps are the endless variations that can be included for beginners, intermediates and advance. The strikes can be modified away from the traditional lunge punch to include faster jabs, shorter and punchier attacks. Intermediate and advance taekwondo one step sparring can also deal with the follow up punch from the opponent requiring a more pragmatic response to someone throwing several techniques your way. We do this by performing the first part of the basic one step sparring tactic, and add on what is required dependant on the follow on attack.

In the following video, we see GM Keith Yates performing one of the basic one step sparring techniques from our curriculum.



While there is a tendency towards 'making up' techniques for your one step applications, I would encourage you to look at the form or pattern you are learning at your rank to derive one step applications. There is no use trying to commit your pattern to memory if you are using your one step like a kickboxing exercise - devoid of all connection to your pattern or your daily martial art training.

Here's a video from one of our classes looking at a one step sparring exercise which includes the middle block and lower block from pattern Chon-ji.



If you liked the above, check out the Taekwondo One Step videos we took during our training session recently.

Related Links



Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

19 Oct 2009

Punches to the Head - an Anonymous Perspective

In continuing to deal with an Anonymous poster who has misgivings about a drill I featured in "Do-san: Defending Against Straight Blast Punches to the Face", I am including portions of his initial post and a video I have pulled off youtube to highlight elements in his post that are legitimate. While I have communicated that I don't particularly like his tone (nor the manner he's taken to Pat from Mokuren Dojo), there is some value to what Anonymous is getting at, and we should bear this in mind while we continue our own training.

The drill itself shows a response to a basic traditional punch thrown iteratively to the defender. The defender is shown deflecting the oncoming arm off centreline using the blade of the forearm. The forearm is rotated 90 degrees back and forth around centerline catching the striking limb from the outside.

Anonymous: I can’t say I’m impressed with this drill. For one the attacker’s punch is fully extended before he even reaches the defender’s face meaning she’ll never get hit even if she does nothing, what’s the point of defending attacks that’ll never connect anyway? With a good defense his fist should pass over your shoulder nearly missing your head, this is clearly not the case here. My second problem with this is that she seems to grab while parrying: this is dangerous since he’ll be able to pull you off balance when he retracts his arm (presumably into another strike), that is if she indeed would be able to grab if he would actually mount some decent attacks: you do not leave your arm dangling after you extended and attacks should be fluid and smooth, not mechanical like in the video.

In the following video I got off youtube, you can see karate students fighting against boxers. To their credit, the karate fighters are performing technically sound moves -- but to engage a boxer using such rules of engagement as you see below is not advantageous as you can see in the following video. This supports what Anonymous is saying - most traditional schools do not deal very well with even the simplest of attacks. A fight with a boxer would be a wake up call. Indeed.



Such a simple match up between a karate or other hard style type martial arts and boxing replicating the same conditions above would find any of us hard pressed to do better than the karateka in the video.

To better enjoy hard style techniques, kicks should have been done to the knee and groin area, attacks or counters should have been to gap close and throw the boxers, even to fight at close range for a takedown. No controls were used and there was certainly no accelerative gap closing that some sportive karate camps use to good effect. Upper body coverage was also very sparse.

The following is a video of a sparring match between boxer and kickboxer. The kickboxer here dominates the boxer -- he goes for the legs early and consistently. It can be said however that the kickboxer does seem to have experience boxing - from the way he covers and the way he's moving. But still, it shows some benefits of using legs.



Anonymous: If you think what I said is wrong than state your own reasons and we can actually have a discussion. If you cannot take criticism and expect everyone to just agree with you and sing your praise then you shouldn’t be voicing your opinions on the internet, let alone putting up videos of any of your techniques.

Yes, Anonymous didn't really say I was full of s***. But to my credit I have ensured all of the Anonymous postings make it on the blog, and in fact I have even agreed to various fundamental areas of his argument. I am not even saying that he is wrong. My position is that he is looking at this particular drill in isolation of our entire program - and assuming we ... namely, I don't know my stuff. Such a perspective as offered by this blog does not accurately give the entire context in which we build basic skills nor does it help Anonymous really learn anything that is of value to himself.

Anonymous: I certainly don’t need to discuss MA with people who only practice pretend, pre-arranged fighting

Anonymous: If this is how you and your students train you’re in for a rude awakening, I wish you good luck if you do get into a fight with someone that doesn’t want to play by your rules and actually knows how to throw a decent punch.

I will reserve my right to continue to voice my opinions on the internet.

This blog takes maybe 10 or so minutes of my time every post. I have to pick out what I want to write about, run through it quickly, and that's it. You can see many of my posts are rush jobs, but this is a resource that I'm building for my own needs. If I am full of s***, anyone can come and critisize (I am happy to post all comments). If you don't enjoy reading the posts, don't read.

Related Links
Do-san: Defending Against Straight Blast Punches to the Face
Do-san: Defending Against Straight Blast Punches to the Face (Original Post)
Getting Punched in the Nose

Anyone in the mood to sing praises? I've not heard singing on my blog.

Cheers,

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Blog at Joong Do Kwan. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

16 Oct 2009

If you can't break the board, blame your assistant!



At least the guy keeps on trying! Maybe one day he'll knock some sense into himself.

Colin
--
Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

Taekwondo Side Kick Defence and Timing

Taekwondo Side Kick Defence and Timing


A fighter can 1) Wait for the attack and counter, 2) attack simultaneously, or 3) preempt and prevent attack from coming.

Last night we had a small class, so I let the green and yellow belt practice with each other. One drill was to allow the green belt to practice his taekwondo side kick, and on the defence was yellow belt using a push kick to stop the side kick from landing.

The push kick off front foot can be used either against the kicking leg itself, the hip, or the support leg.

A huge problem was firstly encountered. It was extremely hard to get the timing right. And of course the timing was wrong -- the push kick was launched when the side kick had been identified, and was already accelerating in mid air. Both participants were doing their kicks at the exact same time like 'other' drills. It became a tae ro bics class!

To properly execute this technique, first the lead leg is used because it is closer to the opponent; the distance it travels is much shorter and thus can get to where it has to get to on time. The next is to read the opponent - when the opponent is shifting back, this is the time to launch the counter attack. Not when the side kick is already on its way. Attacking simultaneously NEVER MEANS to launch your own technique when you see the other technique. It means you need make judgement the moment before the technique is launched.

To make sure your body is responsive, the split second you recognise the body shift, tighten the abdominal muscles and exhale. The nature of the exhalation should tighten your core, and should allow you to bring your leg up and signal the larger muscles to act accordingly.

Having optimal relaxation also allows you to judge the nature of the attack and decide on whether other premptive measures should be taken to reduce the impact, if your defence fails and the side kick comes your way.

Calibrating the side kick
Taekwondo Side Kick: Yul-guk v Won-hyo
Jumping Side Kick

Colin
--
Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

14 Oct 2009

Taekwondo's Applied or Augmented Double Blocks

While I was in Malaysia I picked up a very retro 60s 'Tae Kwon Do Secrets of Korean Karate' by Sihak Henry Cho. It was all taekwondo technique related and did not feature any patterns. Flipping through the book whilst sitting on the john, I was fixated by one particular block - the 'applied arm block' or 'double arm block' or 'yahng-pal makgu.'

From my earlier studies, I was trained to understand that the first outward double block was just like a yop marki or mid block but was supported by the back hand - and thus was 'stronger.' This is not information that I would currently transmit to my own students. Practically I see the augmented middle block, appearing in Taekwondo Pattern Toi-gye (step 29 and 30) as a whole body throw ... the crouched low x-block moving into a standing double block allows you to scissor the entire body, throwing the opponent backwards onto his back.

The first appearance of the double arm block in taekwondo pattern Yul-guk steps 37 and 38 doesn't really lead up to the throw that is seen in Toi-gye ... but I think it is introduced at a real significant point for the developing student. At this stage, the 5th kyu or blue belt or equivalent is developing some good confidence in the skills, speed, coordination and combinations. However, I have noticed that often at this level, difficulties from 'hard style' training surfaces. This is when idiosyncracies of training methodology like the chambering of the fist at the hip, or the line drills, or the need for 'kime' or focus, collides with the fluidity needed so that the practitioner can move in a more unencumbered manner.

The double arm block brings this back chambering hand forward and allows the practitioner to get both hands in front of himself - covering or protecting his centreline. More importantly is not the prominence of both hands in front of the body, but the ability to use the back hand to strike the opponent whilst the opponent has his field of vision distracted by a raised front hand.

Once upon a time these double blocks were considered vital to 'proper' karate - in Motobu Choki's Watashi no Karate, a poster of Motobu Sensei (who was famed for his fighting prowess) shows him with his arms up in this exact formation - a middle block with a back hand augmenting his extended forearm. Apparently, 'mefutode' (p83) was the skill in using both arms for offense and/or defence, and this double block (or whatever else he used it for) was part of his regular bag of tricks.

taekwondo arm block
Choki Motobu demonstrating the double arm block

Nowadays those same double arm blocks don't receive the attention they deserve probably because of this 'hard style' idea that it is an augmented type of defence.

However, if you loosen up the frame and think of the arms as cover or deception or a fake/feint, the back hand or front hand takes on a whole new role and becomes an effective part of your arsenal. Loosen up the stance and allow the hips to rotate and you've got a system that is not unlike a boxer's ... with the ability to parry, gap close, jab, and follow through. Not something to stash away with the other items categorised under 'classical mess'. :-)

Links
Toi-gye List of Posts

Regards

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

5 Oct 2009

Do-san: Defending Against Straight Blast Punches to the Face

I got a somewhat inflammatory response to an old post featuring a drill we use for our beginners. I don't have much time to respond, but the discussion is worth reading. For the first time in about a year of posting someone has basically said I'm full of s***. Go check it out. Rgds, Colin

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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

4 Oct 2009

Off to Malaysia for the Next Week

Training was real good this morning. We did some roundhouse punch drills in the air and on a target. 'Self defence' against a bear hug from the back and full nelson. Then worked on taekwondo patterns for my 9th kyu and 8th kyu students' grading requirements. Post more when I get back.

Cheers!

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.

1 Oct 2009

Martial Art Demos ... what can go wrong, will.

What seems to be a taekwondo demo shows a kick that went awry. I thought it was pretty funny (better than a lot of the other videos that were listed when I typed in tradtional taekwondo). I'm sure my students will empathize with the assistant.

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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.