Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

26 Sep 2013

One Step(s) ... Oh Joy

One step sparring - the most contrived of all exercises.

Having someone come at you, like the way they do, might make you think you're actually doing something - so it gets you focusing on ripping through the technique sequences as fast as possible.

I use a series of one steps from white to black in training. Each taken from or inspired by a Taekwondo pattern. The first from Chon-ji is a step to the outside of the attacking arm, performing a middle block to hyperextend or control the arm, a lower block to strike the arm, and a punch to the ribs.

Do I wait for him to complete his punch before I take a step? Oh no. I move when I see him move. I don't want the oncoming strike to accelerate and for me to cop it while it's at it's fastest. I want to deal with it before it reaches full speed. So I fire my legs when I see his body twitch.

Stepping 'outside' of the attacking arm, I want the step to be just skimming to the outside. I don't want to take a huge step too far away from the opponent's body. If I do, it'll put me again at a mid range distance for both his hands and feet. Keeping close jams his attacking side and puts me further away from his secondary weapon.

I also don't want to just stroll into his strike. While gap closing I want to raise my arms and push my elbows forward. I want something to occupy my centreline, I want my head tucked down, my body curved, and I want to exhale - in case I don't judge the entire thing properly. Counterintuitively, I don't want to turn my body away while going in. I want to head in like I'm going to headbutt the opponent. If you turn away it exposes the body and the side of the face more than is necessary.

When performing the middle block on his extended arm, the middle block is done close to his elbow and the back hand is used to control and pull on his forearm. As I don't really need to focus a strike at this moment, the body is more or less relaxed. This allows me to torque my body and apply some hyperextension to the arm - I am not trying to wrench his arm using my arm strength. I'm using the middle block as level and the body turn to hyperextend his arm.

The lower block is dropped onto the arm to show how devastating a lower block can be on an extended arm! It's not to say I need to do three or more techniques in that single one step. But as you can see, this is turning out to be a longer lesson that simply showing two blocks and a punch. So the lower block is done on top of the forearm, OR the tricep, OR the bicep, OR inside the elbow. The targetting and angle of the strike is as important as the nature of the strike - which is done 'endowing' the striking block with body mass. And just fyi - no need to know 75 ways of doing a down block ... just make sure you target the arm correctly. If you choose to do this at a seminar, partner someone with facial expressivity - and get the photographer to be ready. It's a good shot.

Anyway, after I deal with the arm, and clearing it out of the way with that lower block, I then punch to the ribs using your good ol' regular reverse snap punch to the lower ribs. I want the targetting to be at or just under solar plexus height, and vertically located from over the illiac on the hip to under the lats around the back of the body. For this one step, the point would be more over the hip at solar plexus height. I provide the range because many people don't appreciate how a powerful strike can be done to the back of the body and disable an opponent - most people just think of the head as the ultimate striking zone. They're limiting themselves.

The punch itself is done with hip vibration and focus. Focus meaning at the point of impact the body locks up so that I can transmit body mass through my skeletal frame into the point of impact. When this happens, the legs, which have previously been relaxed, support the strike and drive it home. I've written a lot about this but it takes months of coordination exercises to get this right.

Does this make sense? What I've described is still a flurry of motion, but it takes a good 5 to 10 minutes of practice and discussion to get the point across. Just as a side note - this is a strike and counter ... or 'go no sen.' Meaning the opponent launches an attack, you perceive it and you retaliate with a counter of your own. 'Sen no sen' or simultaneous counter can be highlighted from a Chon-ji inspired one step by performing a lower block on the punching arm whilst it's still right next to the opponent's ribs. It's a really good technique.

Where the first is us dealing with an arm that's closer to us, the second attempts to gap close earlier and to stop the oncoming hand closer to the opponent. It's a good principle that is used by many combative instructors to stop oncoming strikes before attempting to capture the arm - typically to control a knife wielding opponent, and then to take him down.

Both of these moves if done well apply a certain 'frontal pressure' onto the opponent. I am not simply going through some techniques against an opponent to then go through a dozen more. I am doing this technique to stop the opponent and thus my centre of gravity should be felt encroaching on his centre of gravity. If my arms fail at any time might I then knock him out with a headbutt or halitosis.

All this for a one step. Who'd have thought!

Other one steps posts:



--
Colin Wee
Chung Sah Nim Joong Do Kwan (Perth)
Shihan, Hikaru Dojo
Founder The SuperParents A Team
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11 Sep 2013

Not so Hyung but Not so Old

A reader of the blog stopped at JDK's FB Page and asked:

"what still gets you going about Taekwondo (sparks your interest, keeps you motivated), do you have a favorite few forms and why, consider taking some of the oldest forms (like bassai-dai or kanku-dai) and breaking them down in terms of applications, is it important to you to maintain a balance between sportive and self-defense in TKD, why, and if so, how? Just some thoughts...thank you for listening!"

When I was in the US, I practiced a system called 'American Karate.' I only learned later that what we did was Taekwondo as brought to the US by GM Jhoon Rhee, practiced in proximity to its Karate cousins, and isolated from the machinations of the ITF and WTF organisations. When I eventually left the US, I took a page out of that playbook and called what I did 'Traditional Taekwondo.'

While I use the term 'Traditional,' I'm quite a progressive instructor. I want to benefit from the source material that links Taekwondo to Japanese Karate and then further back to Okinawa. I want to embrace improvements in sport sciences within our training. And I certainly want to benefit from the self defence or situational training methodology which combative instructors promote.

In the journeys I've taken to understand the system, I have tried my best to pay tribute to the original spirit of the forms as was taught to me by my teacher. In subsequent encounters with other schools and other instructors, I have received a wide range of feedback some which I'd like to share:

  • Comment 1: Your form is a stone's throw from Karate.
  • Comment 2: ITF doesn't do it that way now, but that was how I was taught.
  • Comment 3: Your forms don't show the evolution which you've undergone.

In response - the forms are not mine. I simply use them as a syllabus. Just like in regular schools, if an inexperienced teacher sticks too closely with a syllabus, their students will get a lackluster education. The experienced teacher however, uses the syllabus as a guide and a launchpad. Likewise, I am merely the 'lens' ... the forms are just a framework for me to introduce skills and share experience.

I have made no secret that my system does continue to practice the vestiges of Chung Do Kwan kata from GM Jhoon Rhee; this has given me a link into the rich tapestry formed by Okinawan and Japanese stylists. But while I highly respect where the source code of hyungs come from, I am at the same time gratified that I don't have to put up with an institutionalised way of interpreting or stylistically claustrophobic view of such kata.

For instance, I want skills that can be immediately useful. I want to teach simple things to beginners. I want to teach more complex things to intermediate and above students. I want to teach skills than can be layered on each other so the system grows with the practitioner. Respectfully, I don't want to dissect Chon-ji and come up with 75 ways of doing the down block - that doesn't make any sense to me.

Some of the insights I have gained from looking at both Taekwondo Hyungs and Japanese Kata are:

  • 1. Some individual techniques in the forms are more valuable than others because they make sense as 'tactics' against same side OR opposite side attacks. Literally, I've got one tactic or one 'solution' in my mind, and when that opponent comes at me, I'm going to use that as my McHappy meal - applied to whatever comes my way. 
  • 2. There was some historical Karate guy that might have said something to the tune of Karate may not be the best to be used in a fight. As in a fight in a ring - with no finishing blows, groin shots, nor sneaking in additional points. With that same logic, everything we see used in a kickboxing match shouldn't be featured prominently in our forms. If you were a thinking practitioner, you might have to ask what is your purpose of training, and how do we align our exercises and drills with the end goal of the form. In fact, what exactly is the end goal of the form? 
  • 3. Traditional system means traditional training. I was at a friend's school and he was complaining to his students that I gave him a bruise when he was helping me teach my students a basic punch - to which I replied and reminded him about the shield he was holding between my punch and his body. Now I'm 5'7", and not muscle-bound. There is no way I can generate power like that by doing more pushups or by going at it on a heavy bag. In fact, unless I put on maybe 20 pounds more muscle in my upper body ... just flapping my arms around isn't going to do much good. So where does that leave you with kata? Well, if you want hyung to work, you got to work towards gaining those skills that make sense to the hyung.
  • 4. Lastly, I read somewhere recently that if you value your life or your family's life you should always carry some form of weapon with you at all times. Just having it there gives you mental clarity - that you might have to use it against an opponent to protect those you love. Similarly, when you look at a hyung ... what do you see? Do you see a grading routine? A useless part of training? Or do you see it as a collection of weapons. Which one can you use? What would you rely on if you were threatened? What would save your family's life?
This post is running away with me. But I did want to make an admission about my favourite form. The form is not a Taekwondo form at all - when I learned it it was called 'Chulgi'. Otherwise versions of it are known as Tekki or Naihanchi. 

Chulgi blew my mind away when I first started it 20 years ago because it seemed ludicrous. I was an adequate semi-contact fighter, but that was all that was in my toolkit. I couldn't use any of that knowledge to understand Chulgi. You move right, cross and uncross your hands. You move left, wave your hands and then stick both hands out. And that's about it. Yet, the more I improved my 'lens' through experience, through introspection, through a shift of focus away from semi-contact fighting ... Chulgi was the form I felt would be the only form I would need if I was pressure tested. 

This October is a sparring competition my students are training for which has meant we've not focused too much on forms over the last few months. When we spar, we switch back and forth from using a semi-contact continuous sparring type approach to the specific-rules full-contact match they will face. We are trying to leverage our semi-contact skills but also looking at some prescriptive tactics that can be used to score points and reduce chances of a lot of points being scored on them. I'm also looking at individual performance and recommending ways to deal with some expected fighting styles they will face. And of course pacing them for the 2 minute x 3 rounds they're going to sweat through. 

While the rules state that there are no above-shoulder strikes, I'm still recommending them practice sound skills in a conflict situation. Coverage and movement are important, and so is distancing with the opponent. Blitz type attacks and weapons are out of the picture. So working the ring is going to be important. Aside from the cardiovascular stress of the competition, the event is really no big deal ... it's just a bit of fun. If you saw my post on FB, I've told my students it's not necessary to win ... so long as they don't lose too badly. It's a world away from hyung and yet not so dissimilar from the mindset needed to apply traditional practices to modern issues!

Thank you for prompting me along.

Keep training!

And before I forget ... if you can, please come support the work I'm doing with IAOMAS - it's a student support organisation that was started by my friend Stuart Anslow. I'm rebooting it and would love everyone to join up!

Links


  • Personal Reflections on Taekwondo



  • --
    Colin Wee
    Chung Sah Nim Joong Do Kwan (Perth)
    Shihan, Hikaru Dojo
    Founder The SuperParents A Team
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    12 Aug 2013

    Visiting Tae Kwon-Do Ki-Do Kwan in Perth

    The last two to three months have been massive. I attended and enjoyed an urban combatives course though unfortunately sustained a back injury that messed me up for nearly a month. Thankfully, I healed in time to return to the US last month so I could train with both of my instructors. Even after all these years, they are not only teaching me fantastic martial arts, they are also providing solid life coaching and personal development - I am blessed to have such teachers and mentors. Over the weekend, I led class for Master Peter Wong of Tae Kwon Do Ki-Do Kwan.

    Back in Dallas July 2013 - getting coached by my instructor Bryan Robbins. It's a one on one session - where I am the main student. There were also other uke or 'attackers' for me to work with. How can it get better than that?

    I write about this most recent experience because it is difficult for me to walk into someone else's school and presume that anything I offer will be of value, is going to stick, and is going to be remembered.

    The core focus of the class was a series of one-steps that I wanted to run participants through. These are taken directly from techniques featured in Taekwondo's Chang Hon pattern set - the same pattern set we both use. One steps are excellent to talk about self defence from an instructor's point of view (see Taekwondo Grappling: Letter & Reply).

    I knew the time would be tight, so my idea was to demo one-steps from the first three patterns, overviewing each as I go, and letting them choose one which they would then work with. I'd then continue with the other patterns drawing one technique from each and asking them to choose one out of the three.

    The first one step from Chon-ji went to the outside, performed an arm destruction and a strike to the ribs. The second featured a knife hand block from the outside, a trap to the lead arm, and a high punch to the neck. The third from Dan-gun featured a block from the outside spear hand to the neck and a takedown. The group chose to look at the second which was a knife hand block to the outside in a defensive stance, a trap, and a punch to the neck.

    Some of the participants had difficulty with the conservative movements I was using. I wanted the blocks to be small, and for the recipient to shift tactically and then occupy a smaller space. Also the end punch showed many of the strikers using a shoulder driven roundhouse punch where I felt a shorter jab would be a more effective approach.

    The second one step chosen was one from Yul-gok - using the pressing block as a application for takedown. Well chosen, it features an arm control from the inside. We bypass the strike to the inside, and wrap the arm closest around the elbow, grabbing onto the attacker's tricep. Then we strike to the head/neck using an elbow or heel palm, and push the face away from the striking hand. Using both extended (but trapped) arm, and head as a 'steering wheel' - we shove/twist the attacker's head under the punching arm. This is a takedown where the attacker is twisted to the ground.

    Land on the attacker with your knee and prepare for the leg kicking up as a secondary weapon. You can also trap the attacker's lead arm and perform a shoulder lock. Smash the attacker's face for added effect.

    I was surprised that this was easier to learn. Major mistakes were people bending over after the takedown, rather than pile driving the knee into the fallen attacker. Also, coming in from the inside seemed to be a little foreign - so I took a few moments to talk about body movement in combination with the stances (see Had enough of that traditional nonsense).

    Unfortunately - along with the other drills and discussion, and sparring to end off, we only had time to do the two one steps. Next time, I hope to be able to show the other few to black belt, and then to let them decide which they like.

    Related



    Colin
    --
    Colin Wee
    Chung Sah Nim Joong Do Kwan (Perth)
    Shihan, Hikaru Dojo
    Founder The SuperParents A Team
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    11 May 2013

    The Fifth Precept of Gichin Funakoshi by Mireille Clark

     5. Spirit first, technique second.

    It has taken me years of contemplation on this precept to even start to come to the understanding of what it is trying to say. I offer the following personal interpretation:

    Inner Spirit is what makes a person continue despite set backs, limitations, mistakes, ridicule, and other challenges.  Without the right Spirit in training, you cannot advance in technique.  There has to be a mental environment of willingness to commit to the movements, dedication to achieving results, and courage to continue to allow a person to experience success.

    Fear stops us.  Fear of doing it wrong, Fear of being hurt, Fear of looking silly, Fear of being rejected, Fear of being too old/young/weak, etc.  Fear motivates us to abandon the effort.  We may choose to complain about others who have applied themselves and succeeded rather than think that we could have achieved the same, and maybe even better, if only we had put in the right Spirit with our efforts.

    How many years can you stand in a dojo and do the same movements as others, and never ever understand the lessons contained in those exercises because you are only doing "just enough" to pass to the next rank?  It's because your Spirit is lacking that you cannot experience the Art in what you are doing. Your heart doesn't beat fast with the exertion, and you cannot exhilarate in the flow of the movement because you haven't commited everything that you have into that strike.  You have to picture WHAT you are doing with your movements so that you understand WHY you are doing them.  Once you have acquired that knowledge then a world of possibilities opens to you.

    Right inner Spirit is what is necessary in a self defense moment... with or without skill and technique.   That inner desire, and focus to survive, and walk away from a confrontation will be more important than any complicated maneuver that you had learned in class. Your mind will find a way to keep you safe using the tools that you had provided yourself.  If you spent all of your training time worried about how well your outfit looked, or trying to avoid doing the exercise properly because it was too difficult or physically draining, then you will have limited tools.

    This is the same with life.  Proper Spirit towards what we do, and why we do it,  will allow us to benefit the most from every moment.  We only have a limited amount of time on this planet to affect ourselves, and those around us.  If we choose to put forth a positive, responsible, and grateful attitude in everything that we do, we can expect that this will become a good catalyst in the world around us ( even if we do not see instant results)If we choose to just mechanically move through the motions, then we will get limited results.

    Train with your Spirit.  How?   

    a)  Face a challenge with a "yes" attitude.  Do your best, and learn from the rest.

    b)  Ask your body to give more than what you think it can do.  Tell yourself that you can do 1 more, and then do it.

    c)  Make each move in your training count.  Feel the response of your body as it shifts weight, and work towards improving your balance, your power, your timing, etc.

    d) Avoid looking at the clock. Time will continue whether or not you know what time it is.  

    e)  Focus on what you are doing, and not what others are not doing.  They are responsible for themselves and will get the results that they deserve from their efforts.

    f) Be grateful for what you have achieved today.  You are never guaranteed a tomorrow.. so be happy that today you were able to do what you did. 

     

    --
    Mireille Clark, Associate
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    5 Apr 2013

    Slagging MMA Kicks



    Taekwondo gets slagged all the time.

    And while I constantly make the distinction that not all Taekwondo is the Taekwondo I do, sometimes I look at who's doing the heckling and I wonder why some people aren't getting some of their own medicine back.

    Today, let's slag MMA kicks. :-) Specifically the roundhouse kick taken from Muay Thai. Muay Thai exponents do them and they are purportedly the most powerful kicks out there. So everyone does them. But not everyone is a Muay Thai practitioner. And therefore not everyone is really doing the kick quite as nicely as a Muay Thai guy would do.

    You know what I mean. Go to most any MMA competition and see how the roundhouse kick is done. Then compare it to the real deal in a Muay Thai competition. The MMA roundhouse kick is most likely the practitioner swinging the leg towards the opponent. It's a flail with little control. I'm not saying there's no power, but when you see a floppy foot, or an uncontrolled drop at the end of the kick - that's a far cry from the devastating roundhouse that you see from a Muay Thai practitioner.

    Check out this following video to see how a Muay Thai kick is really delivered!



    I included that first video of a MMA guy doing a roundhouse kick randomly picked from Youtube. To be fair to him, he's not doing a bad job. There is some control appropriate for the amount of power generation. And I like it that he demonstrated the kick at all three levels. But he's still looking a bit awkward using his upper body to pick the leg up from the ground and could increase his hip strength to improve this extraneous movement.

    Why stop at slagging poorly done MMA roundhouse kicks. Let's look at the karate roundhouse kick - the mawashigeri. In fact, I really like the short range mawashigeri - it's one of my favourite kicks as it creates loads of power with a good amount of subterfuge. The short range mawashigeri folds the leg in a tight space, uses body compression to generate power and unleashes a very devastating kick in a small space.

    The following video however is karate training methodology taken a little too far - let's fold and chamber the knee all the way around so everyone can see it coming. Chambering the knee at a height where you're going to deliver it but off at a 90 degree bearing to the target means you are not using the beautiful rotational/circumferential momentum that a roundhouse kick relies on. What am I talking about? Just draw a straight line from your foot to the target - the more deviation away from that line, the more inefficient is the kick. Of course there is that one tactical problem of letting the opponent see the kick coming from a mile away too.



    Long range roundhouse kicks are swung using the body as a counterweight. The body is turned away in order for the leg to be swung around. The hips are the fulcrum and rotate in order for the leg to reach out. Check out yet the following random video I took off youtube.



    One key success factor which Master Wu doesn't really talk about is to not to displace the centre of gravity too far backward. Many beginners lean back too much to try and get that lift happening in their kick.. In fact, one of the best points of the first MMA video is that the guy steps toward his opponent before throwing the kick at mid-range. Now I'm not saying that stepping in diagonally is the best way to initiate a kick, but it is a good tactical move to generate solid power and is fine for a sportive exchange.

    The next key success factor is to not use the swinging of your hands to try and raise the legs. Who has seen a roundhouse kick coming? Everyone. Well, it's up to you to stop telegraphing. Develop your leg and hip muscles but kicking the air, kicking shields and kicking the bag. Do it slowly. Do it fast. Kick targets lightly. Switch off light switches with your toe. Get control over the leg and you'll be able to pull it off so smoothly the opponent won't see it coming until it's speeding up and crossing the gap!

    Happy to get come backs from any MMA/Karate guys out there.

    For an interesting article on the subject check out Stuart Anslow's The Differences Between Karate's Roundhouse Kick & Taekwondo's Turning Kick.

    Colin
    --
    Colin Wee
    Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
    Hikaru Dojo Shihan
    Founder The SuperParents A Team
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    19 Mar 2013

    Scoop Block from Wonhyo



    The Scoop Block out of Wonhyo - can you see it in Step 19 and Step 22? In the diagram it's labelled Circular Block rather than a scoop. 

    I've seen (and I also teach) applications for this against a simple kick punch combination. Some use the circular technique against a leg to capture it to effect a takedown. Yet another Youtube application shows a funky circular block to defend against a roundhouse punch.

    There are so many other (and better) ways to deal with basic attacks it's not even funny anymore. Also a capture is so much better when the 'scoop' is outside of the body frame, rather than right in front of it. Has no one stopped to ask what happens if you miss capturing the strike, I wonder. As for using a circular block as an arm lock - not entirely rubbish, but I know you don't have much experience doing arm locks so I'll give you points for trying.

    The Scoop Block comes into it's own not against a foot or arm strike, but against a person grabbing you in a clinch or half clinch. The big reach over and scoop under can be done on the same side to capture one arm and ends up grabbing the other elbow. The kick performs a leg reap and the punch either dumps the attacker's head to the floor or punches him after he lands. 

    This is an excellent tactical skill to have. You are in front of a non-compliant opponent, have tried to do 'something' with his arm or take him down. And then are now capturing his arm and peforming a leg reap takedown. If not in a sportive or friendly situation, the arm control provides management of weapon arm, leaving the other arm free to continue to strike opponent. 

    Looking at variations on the theme - if I take the 'Twin outer forearm block' as a 'helmet' type self defence cover, you can gap close through a melee, and then use the lead arm to scoop an opponent's extended arm. 

    If you ever been hit, you'd know covering up is GOOD FOR YOU!

    The resulting 'High inward single-hand shuto' then comes into its own as it brings the back hand downward in a serious response against a very aggressive opponent. You just apply it onto the shoulder or onto the neck as you are comfortable with. See the following image I'm borrowing off the web ...

    This is about what I'm trying to get at. :-) And so should you.
    With an attacker's arm captured, you can do strikes and takedowns fairly easily. 

    Enjoy!

    Colin


    Taekwondo Won-hyo List of Posts

    Won-hyo: Defending Against a Kick Punch Combination
    Won Hyo: Defend Against Anything!!
    Making Kata Work for You
    Taekwondo Hyung: Won-Hyo Step 27 & 28 as Over the Shoulder Throw
    Won-Hyo: Defensive Side Kick
    Won Hyo: Scoop Block v Kick Punch Combo
    Calibrating the Side Kick
    Won Hyo Hyung Side Kick
    Won-hyo: Where are your eyes on the back of your arse?
    Won-hyo: The Kihon Kata Koma
    Won-hyo: The Taekwondo Side Kick
    I've Broken My Finger and Have Lost the Will to Fight
    --
    Colin Wee
    Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
    Hikaru Dojo Shihan
    Founder The SuperParents A Team
    [Traditional Taekwondo Techniques | Subscribe | FAQs | Sitemap | FB]
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    9 Jan 2013

    Acquiring Roundhouse Kicking Power

    I was working with a couple of young practitioners on the lawn a few days ago, and I noticed one of them kicking but only kicking with the leg. Kicking with the leg? Aren't all kicks done with the leg? Well, yes, but that's not what I mean. What I meant was that, I know that kicking power was quite important to this young man, and while I'm sure he felt like he could apply some power into his leg, well, what I was seeing was that he wasn't applying as much power as he could.


    Many people equate striking power with fitness and muscle strength. The faster or stronger you are, the more power you can put into your strike - it's logical. But that only works when you are applying power correctly in the first place. For instance, if you're flapping your arms, straining to raise your leg up, feel unbalanced after sending your leg out, or if you take a little longer to get back to a guard position after firing a kick, well, chances are your kick isn't as effective as it could be. 

    Fitness and strength would only help you improve on a kick that's already good. Fitness and strength isn't going to give you a powerful kick. 


    So back to this informal session I had. My young friend had power through his leg but his body was fairly relaxed. The leg was basically a jab. What I wanted to explain was that for that particular long range 'roundhouse' kick, the power generation was done using a 'pendulum' type swing. It's not about just extending your leg and hitting the target. 

    So I got my friend in front of me and performed his kick on his gut. I made sure to hold my body still and kick him with enough power that he knew that the kick was solid. The kick hit, and for sure, you could see the hydrostatic shock going through his gut. Then what I did was to show him that for the force represented by the leg, it was connected to the body at the hip - that was the fulcrum, and the counterweight was the body. So what I wanted to do was to link the power of the leg to the greater mass of the body.

    So I set up for a new kick, this time ratcheting the power of my leg down so that you could visually see that the power of the kick was less that what I levied on him at first. The second kick however, engaged my body mass more because I tightened up my core mucles, linked it up with the extension of the leg and the swinging motion of the kick. Upon impact I increase muscle tension so that the mass of the body was 'transmitted' into the target more effectively. 



    As the power of the kick went through his body,  you could see the realisation that even if the leg was relaxed, the increased mass driving the circumferential momentum spiked the power applied by the strike.

    The next question out of him was a very pertinent one - he doesn't see the body moving as much as a counterweight as indicated by my basic explanation. It's true. But the counterweight can still be applied effectively if you tighten the muscles at the right time, the shifting of the body and the hip need not be so overt as to show an equal and opposite movement because the body is not piece of machinery - all you need is the correct muscle control immediately before and immediately after the point of impact.

    Links



    Colin
    --
    Colin Wee
    Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
    Hikaru Dojo Shihan
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