Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

20 Jun 2009

Promotions by William Mioch

The kyu-dan belt ranking system is a relatively new invention for the martial arts. It was adapted by the founder of Judo (Jigoro Kano) from a ranking system used in Go and other traditional arts, such as Flower Arranging. (He also invented the judogi, the training clothes used in Judo, Karate and many martial arts around the world.) He introduced the dan ranking in 1883, when he graded 2 students to Shodan.

Many traditional chinese schools don't have an equivalent system of ranking. So, I asked myself the question, should my Kung Fu students have grades and belts? What are the pro's and con's?

For the instructor:
The biggest advantage to instructors is organisation. A single instructor can look at the students in a class, see their progress from their belt and know just what stage that student is at.

Let's say the first instructor is sick the next week. Another instructor can come into the class and know very quickly what level those students are at.

By following a widely recognised system like the kyu-dan system, even instructors from other schools can get some idea of what level these students are at.

For the student:
Although a student can set themselves a goal such as "I will learn this Kata in 3 months", it is not a very specific goal. A well-defined syllabus with attainable levels can help the student to set SMART goals.

Students also know what level other students are at. This can help to avoid accidents and injuries and allow students to explore their leadership skills when working with lower ranked students.

Being able to have a physical representation of their achievement, such as a belt, is a big motivator to many people. It renews motivation and keeps pushing the student to attain the next level.

Cons:
The classic negative pointed out in regards to using belts and ranks is that they become more important than the actual martial arts! However, in my experience, like technique, this kind of attitude would have to come from the top to get any grounding.

Overall, the idea of grades has many benefits and few negatives. It is a great motivator and tool for instructors to keep organised and for students to measure and drive their performance.

Let me know what you think, or if there's any points I missed out on!

PS: Keep an eye out for my next post, how SMART goals apply to your martial arts training.
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William Mioch
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

11 Jun 2009

William Mioch Making Us Proud

William Mioch practicing weapons form

Bill Mioch, a contributor to Traditional Taekwondo Blog and an associate black belt of mine was recently in Taiwan training.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

Oldman's Boobishi 'Nintendo Wee' Traditional Taekwondo Post

Oldman's Boobishi is a collection of martial art cartoons that provide a humourous and insightful look at the world of martial arts. The blog is scheduled to be decommissioned - or at least no new posts are expected in the horizon.

Some time ago The Daily Oldman produced a cartoon strip referring to my blog and traditional taekwondo. It slipped me to mention it here.

Oldman is right. There is a certain realism that the martial arts brings to my life - a directness and 'truth'. Check out his Nintendo Wee post - it's a fantastic title, isn't it? More so given I don't ever play video games.

Please let me take this opportunity to wish Oldman aka 'Mark Cook' all the best in his new role at his company.

Colin

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

10 Jun 2009

The Single Most Important Lesson in Martial Arts

From the post with the same name at Martial Development.


When flying down a hill on a mountain bike wearing neither helmet nor pads, and when that front tyre explodes, the single most important lesson when the odds are stacked against you is to take control of your own destiny and perform that forward roll — or really whatever technique you’ve got — like there was no tomorrow. And there will be.


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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

5 Jun 2009

Thank You to My Seniors

Where would I be without their guidance?

Exec-Level Coaches
Keith Yates A-KaTo
Tim White MLCAA

My Direct Teachers
Bryan Robbins Yokage Aiki Ju Jutsu
Michael Proctor Renbudo Karate
Paul Hinkley
Tony Tan Suan Hee

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

Thank You to My Online Martial Arts Buddies

I'm just checking my site stats, and was reminded to thank my online buddies (and their fantastic blogs) for pushing traffic my way. From my top 10:

Christian's TKD Journey
Pat's Aikido and Judo Mokuren Dojo
Ikigai
Striking Thoughts
Dan Djurdjevic The Way of Least Resistance

Cheers guys!

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

Risk and Reward

I remember speaking with an 'old school' black belt from the 60s and he was telling me of the weirdest training exercise I've ever heard of. Black belts in his school were required to put their hand into a plastic bag full of roaches - reach for a handful and squeeze them dead. He justified this by saying once you got over the idea that your hand is precious, it was much easier using it as a weapon and letting it fly.

This theme of self-sacrifice in the martial arts is not a new one. Old school training and fighting methodology is replete with anecdotes and myths. The idea that with the right amount of self-sacrifice, you can commit yourself to those techniques which will stop your opponent in his tracks.

Commitment and intent are two highly prized traits for a martial artist. But as modern practitioners, we must also value intelligence and survival. Each technique and tactic will have its own risk and reward. It is up to the practitioner to know how much force they can generate but also understand what kind of rebound or injuries can occur if you are met with non-compliance or if you miss or if you didn't get the right angle of entry ... etc.

I've seen a really large experienced black belt fall to the mat after getting his hand broken - he was side kicked and he left his hand near his hip. The hand got sandwiched between his hip and the foot. Now if someone like him drops to the mat from a relatively 'small' injury -- the assumption is anyone else will be affected similarly by even lesser pain.

Be alert.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

2 Jun 2009

Taekwondo Pattern Chon-ji White Belt Grading Oral Test

Taekwondo Pattern Chon-ji

I've had more than a few questions pertaining to the oral section of the upcoming white belt test this weekend. The oral section for beginners is a good way to get beginners understanding bast knowledge of their art, definitions, etc. 9th, 8th, 7th kyu or gup would focus on definitions and terminology. The oral component of the test represents about 10-15% of the entire grade. Students should expect around 3 questions.

Some of the questions white belts can expect are:
1. What is the meaning of Taekwondo?
2. Who is the founder of Taekwondo?
3. What is the meaning of Taekwondo Pattern Chon-ji?
4. How many techniques feature in Chon-ji?
5. What is the technique hardan marki?

Intermediate belts may be asked about important dates in taekwondo, definitions of the meaning of other martial arts and other variants of TKD. Intermediate students will also be asked about the comparison of technique sequences between forms and within forms.

Senior students may be asked on strategic implications of techniques, distancing, philosophical terms, roles, advantages/disadvantages of kyu-dan grading structure, personalities in the martial arts, etc.

Check out Grading Results Sample for more grading posts.
Also see Martial Arts Grading: Oral Section for more surprises as to how I use the oral test to add more complexity in the testing.

Links



Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]