Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

24 May 2010

Do You Hate Taekwondo Pattern Yul-guk?

If you are convinced Taekwondo pattern Yul-guk Step 15 and 16 are two horizontal open palm 'pressing' blocks don't read any further.

I suppose pressing blocks may be used as a way to slowly prise aside a clinch or grab or bearhug. My research into patterns or kata also indicates that slower techniques are done slow because of the risk of injury (indicating level of lethality) and thus have to be performed more deliberately with your training partners.

These two techniques are poor examples of pressing blocks. Aside from the main way of teaching them as arm locks (kaitenage and takiotoshi), yesterday we ran a drill that used the two 'pressing blocks' as a takedown involving the control of the opponent's legs.

The Yul-guk Drill

#1 The opponent throws a left lunge punch. Deflect and strike toward the face using your right hand. Reach down with your left hand and wrap your forearm under his leg. Think of a large steering wheel, turn to the right, and drop the opponent onto his back.

#2 The opponent throws a right lunge punch. Deflect and strike toward his face using your right hand. Wrap your right hand around his neck and tuck his neck under your armpit. Reach down with your left hand and wrap your forearm under his leg. Think of a large steering wheel, turn to the right, and drop the opponent toward his face. (see #4 Yaritame in Throws and Locks in Karate).

The great thing about this technique is that it works whether or not you get the technique right. So long as you deal with the strike and counter, you can throw the opponent forward or backward easily. Just bend over, grab the leg, and steering wheel the guy where you want him to go.

Yul-guk list of posts
Aikido and Taekwondo

External Links



-- Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

14 May 2010

Taekwondo Front Kick Equilibrium and Technique

Last night, amongst other things, I was drilling my taekwondo yellow belt on the basic front kick from Taekwondo Pattern Do-san. We were working striking an opponents body behind the cover provided by the front arm. As a beginner was performing the kick, I noticed disequilibrium occurring in the front kick. Essentially, the body was jerking forward in an attempt to balance out the weight of the kick as it was being lifted up. The front kick was inefficient, and had to be modified.

My thinking was to first get the front kick practiced with a more relaxed manner than previously done by this student. A body that is too tensed means a student wasting too much power and who's probably going to be too tired to concentrate on minor changes. A taekwondo student trying too hard at any drill is not in the best mental state to accept changes to his form.

My next instruction was to get him to lift up his knee and balance himself out. I called this a 'balance point.' What I wanted was for him to remain relaxed, go for the balance point - with body just slightly held back, hip slightly rotated on the vertical, and with knee held out. I said to forget about the kick, get to the balance point whilst calibrating on the target. The focus on the target will eventually get him to send the hip out and land the front kick on the striking zone.

Focus too much on the 'end bit' of the entire weapon and you forget that karate or taekwondo is driven by the entire body. Most taekwondo beginners and intermediate students just forget all about how power is generated - through the mass shifted by legs and hips. The structure of the body then transmits this power into the striking tool. Many taekwondo beginners think just on the end bit of their weapon. And invariably only can perform up to the strength of their arm or leg. More advanced taekwondo students strike with their entire body and can generate lots more striking force with much less effort.

There were a few other fine tuning points that I discussed - pertaining to the support foot. The weight has to tend towards the ball of the foot rather than be left on the heel. The support foot should also provide support. Just because a more adept kicker looks pretty relaxed doesn't mean there's a deficit of optimal tension. Tension is always there, but when it's balanced out, the tension is there appropriately to support the forward striking force. No tension and the kicker will fly backwards. That's NOT traditional taekwondo. :-)


Colin

-- Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

7 May 2010

Shotokan's Secret - With New Material

Shotokan's Secret - by Kyoshi Bruce Clayton PhD

Some of you might think I'm in love with Dr Clayton with the number of times he and his book Shotokan's Secret is mentioned on my blog:

Taekwondo Yop Marki Middle Block With a Vengeance
Dan-gun Power Generation in Karate Styles
Australasian Taekwondo Magazine

Reading Shotokan's Secret was a life changing event for me as a martial artist. At a time when I was researching forms and understanding applications and drills from my own style, the book helped to clarify my thoughts on what it was like living my life as one of the old masters of karate. It made my martial arts more real for me, and raised my enthusiasm and passion for this hobby back to an all time high.

I thank Dr Clayton for giving me the opportunity to meet him when I was in the Napa Valley in 2006, and for being so kind as to mention my meager participation on his forum and communications through emails. I have enjoyed talking with this bona fide martial art historian, and am thankful for the large inspiration he has played within the development of my own practice and understanding of the martial arts.

People like Dr Clayton make me proud to be practicing what I do, and make me confident in the quality of people in the martial arts industry. Please do yourself a favor and check out his book. See follow up post Shotokan's Secret Expanded Version is Out.

Colin

-- Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

5 May 2010

Developing a Relationship with Your Taekwondo Patterns

I've often been asked whether I get bored teaching the same s*** over and over again.

Last night I taught Tekki/Chulgi, Taekwondo Yul-gok, and Taekwondo Dan-gun.

I've practiced these Taekwondo patterns for around 20 years. Know what? I totally enjoyed the session. We mixed it up with some applications from the patterns, some drills, and of course the technique sequences. I also got to talk about what each pattern was urging us to accomplish. It's like a personality - the more you reflect on it, the more you understand it.

Teaching them is like introducing friends to each other. Each of your friends don't know the other, but you're the mediator and you think they'll get along fine. So you make the first introduction, then perhaps talk separately to each of them about the other, then let them develop their relationship themselves.

Good luck to developing your own martial relationship with your Taekwondo patterns.

Cheers,

Colin

Links
Chulgi: Punching Across the Body
Toi-gye: Mountain Block

--
Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

4 May 2010

What role does body hardening exercises play in Taekwondo?

During Taekwondo sessions, I often let my students land kicks or hand strikes on my body with increasing force. While it's not yet full power, the strikes are approaching it, and have been described by other blackbelts as 'old school' (ala Uechi Ryu Karate's Hojo Undo). What benefits arise from getting struck like this? Aside from increasing tolerance to pain or body hardening (which I don't really believe in or promote), why would we do this? In sparring, at full speed, does this help? Typically not. Full speed taekwondo or karate attacks to body most often land without the receiver able to totally prepare themselves for the strike. However, accepting strikes to the body during practice teaches a major lesson - and that is that the effective range and location of the impact for most kicks have a very limited ' range of effectiveness. For instance, if I can move my body one or two inches away or rotating around the strike, most kicks will be absorbed or deflected without me having to shift my whole body weight away or toward the kicking leg. You will not however be able to play with this nicely unless you get your partner to commit and land very hard strikes or kicks on your body. You need to feel the pressure, synchronize your timing, and modify/collapse your body structure in order to nullify the force of the kick or strike. Cheers, Colin

Taekwondo Sparring Posts
Cross Style Comparison: Body Hardening

External Links
Hojo Undo Quotes
Shaolin Monks v Maori Warrior
How Hard Should You Beat Your Body?
Fighting Gear
Sanchin Shime
Are You Tough Enough?
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Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

3 May 2010

Yul-guk: Side Kick, Grab, and Elbow ... What???

My blue belt was practising his side kicks from taekwondo's won-hyo pattern. He was doing a nice 'plain vanilla' side kick against a target. To his credit, the kick was nicely done and generated a lot of power. I however approached him and was looking through his pattern requirements for blue belt. Taekwondo's Yul-guk requires you to perform a side kick, then a control and elbow to your opponent. There's no way you can perform any elbow strike if your side kick sent your opponent flying. So I advised him to change the side kick and strike the target with a short range, close quarter snapping side kick. It's the karate type side kick that's almost undistinguishable from a roundhouse kick if done in the air. Of course he was none impressed with the down shifting of power. You don't get to whallop the target as hard with this kick. This short range snap side kick is not to be applied similarly to the other normal side kick. Firstly it is more versatile and can be used as a takedown tactic. Secondly, it should be applied much lower on the body than a regular side kick. Think of it as a stomp to the knee or shin or foot or fallen opponent. Once you think of it outside the realms of competition or the kick shield, then you'd begin to understand the true worth of it as a self defence or combative weapon.

FTT3SK9DS428
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Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

Promote Taekwondo and Martial Arts Blogs

This Black Belt is getting wiser and more efficient in his old age! My list of taekwondo and martial arts blogs was getting a little too long to manage. What I've done is to move all of my manually entered links to Google Reader. I have also embedded a clip of all my taekwondo and martial arts blogs from Google Reader into my previous blog list. If you want to promote your blog and don't see it listed there, please let me know.

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Colin Wee Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

1 May 2010

Taekwondo Yul-guk: Neck Manipulation, Leg Defence, and Backfist

Today at Taekwondo class my blue belt practiced

Yul-guk: If you control the Head, you control the Body (Steps 15-17)

... this blogging thing is great, I don't have to re-write my old posts on the subject!!!

We also practiced a leg defence using step 11 & 12 where we catch the oncoming striking kick using a variety of capturing techniques. Instead of sweeping the support leg, we lift the striking leg aggressively. To good effect I added in the front kick to the nuts, though my uke was already not impressed with the net results ... nearly falling, smashing his head on the decking, and tearing skin off on the exposed nails.

We also chatted about

Yul-guk: Step 35-36 Jumping Backfist in X-stance - It Could be Taught as the Most Useless Technique Ever!!!

I'm really loving my blog.

Anything to add?

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia. Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.