Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

31 Mar 2010

Your Kid's TKD Class is Not My Karate on 24FightingChickens

I was asked to include more posts for senior students. Here is something from 24FightingChickens for my intermediate and senior students. Your Kid's TKD Class is Not My Karate.

I was having a similar conversation with a parent friend of mine yesterday about motivation. I was talking about how I motivate myself, and how I ... at 40yo, am still punishing myself on a regular basis doing my pushups, training, visualisation, etc. All of it is an objective oriented exercise not for some personal self glory. While maybe it once was, the black belt however is not there to pull chicks.

The video below is of my nephew at a coloured belt grading doing a sparring session. Don't get me wrong, they're doing really well for their age. But by and large, sparring is all like this. This is an example of what I do not do.



I train for an unthinkable situation - home intrusion. There would be multiple opponents, mostly armed, at night, in a high target environment (where my kids are the targets), they're jacked up on whatever they've just dosed themselves up on, and we're facing off in a tight space. I myself would probably be bedraggled, may or may not be armed, and am the last and only line of defense.

I will not fail.

Keep safe, my friends.

Check out
My Work as a Curator of a Taekwondo System
Karate v Taekwondo



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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

How to Practise Martial Arts

Prompted by my 5th kyu, I have invited all my students to train at my house tomorrow. In essence, I wanted to discuss how each they should practise with the equipment on hand.

Typically students show up at class, get spoon fed some training, and are left on their own devices at home. Practice is extremely variable - it may either be cardiovascular, or in my case when I was a teenager, just focused on technique and getting hand eye coordination happening.

I want to cover:

The objectives of self practice: how to vary it and mix it up between practising objective oriented tactics to just getting a nice workout.

The parameters described by basic techniques like the front and roundhouse kicks, and how to apply that on a punching bag (either hanging or as in 'Bob' one with a water base)

How to vary individual technique whilst in front of the striking target in order to train gap closing, accuracy, timing, and angle of entry skills.

How you can use the base of the striking target to practice some really valuable self defence skills.

How we generate power with hand techniques and how to hit harder - basically to finish off the fight.

How to integrate a training journal into your training and take control of your progress through the arts: documenting what you are doing, how often, and what you are wanting to focus on next.

And if I install my striking post on the wall ... how to generate a lot of power in a short distance with a reverse snap punch.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

25 Mar 2010

Dan-gun: Stepping Aside for an Oncoming Attack

Today we practiced Taekwondo Pattern Dan-gun: Shuto Knifehand into a Roundhouse Punch. Essentially it's stepping aside and doing a shuto block to the outside of an oncoming punch. The step is doing with the back leg stepping diagonally back and the front leg dragged into place and facing the opponent.

There was difficulty establishing distancing for the retaliation. There was difficulty getting the jab over the striking arm. What we want to do is to learn stepping aside, but also trying to get it so that the distancing is correct so as to allow the punching hand to land without overly reaching out. Don't sweat it. An oncoming opponent like that is likely to just bowl you over -- step aside, cover with the knife hand, track the opponent and jab loosely.

Stand there and 'take it like a man' and you'll end up on your behind ... with the opponent trampling all over your face. The block has got to allow the opponent to race past you - his power is surging linearly after all. There is a time and a place to deflect the strike minimally so you can use the opponent's force against him. But remember, this is an 8th kyu requirement. So the student needs to be able to deal with big movement, and corresponding defences.

Keep training!

Colin

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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

16 Mar 2010

Handlocks for Hard Stylists

Checkout a previous post on the subject at: Taekwondo v Aikido

Unlike Aikido practitioners, hard stylists like taekwondo practitioners don't really get handlocks. Sure many may go through the motions, but at the end of the day the technique is usually sent packing and the joint in question is muscled into submission.



We don't practice Aikido. So while there is room to improve, we'll just have to take it like a man ... and put up with our skill in joint manipulation. In my curriculum, locks and throws serve primarily to complement multi-person sparring. You take the person down and place them between yourself and the opponent. So whatever arm is offered or available, the lock you place has to be used to hold the opponent between yourself and his girlfriend.

Of course joint locks can be used to immobilise a single opponent, but that's something else.

Last two weekends, we've taken advantage of the break after grading to practice joint locks and throws. To complement the signficantly aikido session, I also taught a few gap closing skills. This allowed us to surge into the opponent, trap one or two of his hands whilst striking to the face, and then putting on the handlock. Trapping the hand is as simple as placing an open palm on top of his forearm, pressing it into his chest.

Lots of this surge allowed a forward pressure on the lead hand of the opponent. This results in the opponent *immediately* pushing back ... which is the basis for you to use one of your hands to grab and separate his arm from the rest of the body. Another related method is to trap one hand, smack his head, and then go for the opposite hand.

Or else you trap the hand, smack the head, and then go for the neck ... ala Yul-kok.

Or if you're inspired by Basai ... you trap the hand, then go for the legs.

But practice surging in and using both hands to occupy the opponent before applying the lock or the throw. As I've said before, simple stuff works best... so vary it and practice!

Cheers.

Colin



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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

15 Mar 2010

"When you can take the pebble from my hand... " special martial art training

This looks like some of the 'special' training we have in our school!



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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

13 Mar 2010

Effectiveness of Traditional Systems Discussion on Facebook

There's a discussion of the effectiveness of Traditional systems on the Traditional Taekwondo Facebook Group between myself and Forrest Littlejohn. Mr Littlejohn is a long-time Kempo Karate instructor from American Karate and Taekwondo Organization. I've had the pleasure of fighting Mr Littlejohn a couple of times when I trained in the US; he's built strong and tough, but you'd be impressed with his fluidity of movement and control.

And hey ... there's lots of mention of 'maturity' in our discussion ... given it's been some 15 years since we last trained together I wonder whether he's talking about my age???!!!! :-)

It's good talking with honest-to-goodness martial artists whom you've not trained with in some time. Looking back over the years, I've got to say I've enjoyed spending that amount of time with these guys. They're good value.

Cheers.

Colin

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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

10 Mar 2010

Sensei Paul Hinkley's Birthday Today

Mr Hinkley was one of my American Karate and Taekwondo instructors when I was with the SMU Martial Arts Club. A soft-spoken polite and intelligent man, he is at once one of the most effective fighters and instructors I have met. He generates what seems to be an unbelievable amount of power from a lean wiry frame.

I've heard a few things about Mr Hinkley, all of which are mentioned in awe. Here is a snapshot of what has been whispered to me:
1. He wakes up in the morning and practices forms for 1 hour every day.
2. He shaves and brushes teeth with his non-dominant left hand in order to improve fine motor skills
3. He took a full bo strike to the head (done accidentally) and didn't flinch. It was mentioned that he was grinning whilst blood poured down his face.
4. He was doing 100 situps a month after open abdominal surgery.
5. A black belt friend of mine received a roundhouse kick to the forehead from My Hinkley, apparently the most powerful strike he ever received in his life, and thought that that was the end of his world.

Mr Hinkey approaches the martial arts with an engineer's eye. He was talking about bunkai, applications, effectiveness of strikes, and angles of entry before they were 'in fashion.' Through him, I realised the value of technique, kata, and basics. From his influence, I realised that martial arts required us to engage an opponent mentally.

Once upon a time, Mr Hinkley was belabouring a point about step 27 and 28 in Toi Gye - an open palm strike into a manji-uke (one down block and one up block). He was discussing the need for the lower block to provide a sheering force to the right hand groin strike. While I didn't understand why he singled out that particular point for those of us who were there, nowadays I find myself belabouring the same issue over and over again to my own students!

Above all, I remember Mr Hinkley as a martial artist who was constantly seeking to improve himself. There was no other person he was more tough on than he was on himself. He is the model traditional martial artist.

All of us would be served well to look at Mr Hinkley's journey through the arts as inspiration for our own progress.

Please join me in wishing him a happy birthday.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

9 Mar 2010

Intermediate Belts to Traditional Taekwondo

Intermediate belts to Traditional Taekwondo take a significant departure from beginners. Beginners need to learn some very specific ways of generating power, and this is often taught in a very contrived manner .... namely, one punch left dangling out and the other pulled all the way to the hip. This allows you to step forward and practice the same technique again. But is possible the best and worst thing hard style martial art systems did when creating a teaching methodology.

So intermediate belts will learn ways to use both of their hands whilst dealing with strikes from opponents. Expect to hold both hands out, and expect to use both hands to deal with all strikes coming your way. This covers both trapping, coverage, blocking, striking, and some manipulation.

Lots of joint manipulation however, still require the pull back or hikite hand to work. But this pull back hand or hikite doesn't always make it all the way to the hip or ribs ... and is dependant on the technique, body position, and what you want to do with the attacker (use him as shield between you and other opponents, or drop him to the ground or throw him towards his other girlfriends).

The biggest obstacle for many intermediate belts in Traditional Taekwondo is to learn to maintain an 'optimal' relaxedness for the techniques to work. Speed will decrease with tension, so a relaxed body helps increase speed. But become too flaccid and 'couch potato' like, and you lose the tension needed to support the speed, acceleration and striking force. So the intermediate belt needs to learn how to keep some optimal relaxedness that will help with movement and control of his extremities.

Cheers.

Colin

Links



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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

6 Mar 2010

Oral Test for Grading

We're conducting a beginner to intermediate grading session tomorrow.

The oral component of the test for beginners may ask to state your knowledge of something factual about Traditional Taekwondo. For instance, I might ask:
1. What does Taekwondo mean?
2. What is the meaning of Chon-ji, Dan-gun, Do-san (dependant on the requisite form)?
3. What is a down block called in Taekwondo?
4. What was the name of the founder of Taekwondo?

For yellow - orange belts, the oral component may ask more historically challenging questions. It may also start to include some knowledge on critical analysis of the form.
1. Where does Taekwondo originate?
2. What year was Taekwondo officially formed?
3. What was the name of the Grandmaster who brought Taekwondo to the United States in the mid 1950s?
4. What are the differences between Taekwondo and Karate?
5. What are the similarities between Taekwondo and Karate?
6. In the 10th technique of Do-san why do you punch downwards before the upward block?

Green belts and above are required to answer challenges pertaining to their knowledge of techniques:
1. What is the difference between the first and second side kick in Won-hyo?
2. Explain an application for the scoop block in Won-hyo.
3. Why are we performing the side kick at mid-level?
4. HOw do we generate power over the short range used in the knife hand strike?
5. How do we generate power over the short range use in traditional roundhouse kicks.
6. Explain the difference between a short range versus long range roundhouse kick.

More senior belts may be asked questions pertinent to their growing understanding of the strategy we employ in our school:
1. Explain the benefits of learning handlocks in our school in regard to multiple opponent fighting.
2. Explain the opposing philosophy of Yuk-guk and Toi-gye?
3. Self defence articles typically ask the defender to 'run away'. Where would you run away to? Discuss.
4. Of what use is Chon-ji for a beginner that has no experience dealing with attackers?
5. How do you land a punch at long range?

Black Belt Candidates and above may be asked on all the above questions, including knowledge necessary to prepare them to communicate technical knowledge:
1. What are plyometric exercises.
2. Name 5 drills appropriate for a beginner in learning a low block.
3. How do you troubleshoot a side kick?
4. Describe a traditional exercise to increase striking power.
5. Descrive a modern exercise to increase striking power.
6. Discuss the options for an inflexible adult when starting the martial arts.
7. How do you overcome the fight/flight syndrome?

Good luck!

Colin

Taekwondo Chon-ji White Belt Grading Oral Test
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

4 Mar 2010

Keeping safe by Mireille Clark

Too often we relax our guard in a public place with the assumption that we are safe because we've been this way before, or done this so many times without any problems happening that it has become comfortable to us.

I believe that one of the most dangerous additions to our modern lifestyle is the various MP4 players/Ipods/Cell phones that are being used in public places. You can see people walking down the street, sitting on a bus, or jogging through a park with these ear buds showing on their heads. By doing this they are taking away the most important aspect of Self Defense available to them, ie: their sense of awareness of their environment.

We rely on two main senses when we are paying attention to our environment, namely Sight, and sound. It is rare that we would use taste, touch, or smell to alert us to danger, but it can happen.

To be honest, I found that sound has always helped bring my attention to potentially dangerous situations. A sudden sharp crackling noise, the sound of footsteps near me, or the sound of a car approaching has alerted me to potential danger, and I have been able to avoid that problem. I would actually feel my ears "perk" up, and my mind would assess the various reasons that these sounds exist then I would turn my head to investigate. I have been able to avoid being crushed by a falling tree limb, or being struck by a quickly approaching vehicle thanks to the sounds that I caught just in time.

One is under the illusion that they are safe when they are listening to the distracting sounds coming from their system. Their minds are occupied with their favorite song, or listening to the news, and is not fully alert.

Predators will attack when the prey is not aware, or when the prey is in a disadvantaged position. If you were to attack someone, would you not choose the person who is daydreaming, or acting distracted, or even unaware of their environment?

Although convenient, and portable, I would suggest that MP4/Ipods/etc. players be used only in a place where you are assured your safety. Jog with them in a Gym, or running track in a wellness facility. Walk with them on a treadmill, or sit with them when you are safe at home.

As Sensei Gichin Funakoshi has explained "When you leave home, think that you have numerous opponents waiting for you. It is your behavior that invites trouble from them." ( From the 20 Precepts)

Child Safety on Escalators
Child Safety in the Face of an Aggressor
10 Tips to Improve Your Child's Safety
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Mireille Clark
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.