Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

26 Feb 2010

Taekwondo Pattern Chon-ji: Down Block Drills Part Two

Taekwondo Pattern Chon-ji: Down Block Drills Part One

Last night, I prescribed a drill for my white belts for their Taekwondo hardan marki or down block. The first move was used as a 'wipe' or deflect against a lunge or jabbing punch to the face. When I stopped them halfway to focus in on the lateral 'face wiping' move, I was questioned by one of my students about the practicality of the drill.

In truth, I do not believe this is the best way to apply that particular motion. You have the one opposite hand folder under, and the blocking hand left to deflect a fast oncoming punch to the head. While it is not impossible to do, the likelihood is high that the beginner will miss and will get tagged by the oncoming strike.

The aim of the practice was to separate each motion of the block and create value to the student by showing that it is possible to apply the block in a few different ways. The speed of the strike also helps with timing and distancing. But it is true, I am not prescribing that the block be used against an oncoming punch in the manner in which I displayed.

I prefer to think that beginner strategy should be to avoid dealing with strikes altogether. So either launch an attack before the escalation or to time gap closing between strikes or to use deception in order to lower opponent's attack/defenses. This allows the student to grab clothing or extremity or to allow opponent to grab a part of his/her body. This then allows student to apply the various components of the taekwondo hardan marki down block - folding can be a strike to the head and the down block can be a wrist break or groin strike.

Successful application of a part of the opponent's body that is controlled then allows the student to take the opponent down and stomp on the closest parts of the opponent's body.

If you're interested in a related discussion and to watch a video of us performing a similar one step sparring drill, check out Taekwondo One Step Sparring.

Chon-ji Drills and Variations
75 Down Blocks
Look at Me, I'm doing Taekwondo and That's Why I Look as Stiff as a Board
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

19 Feb 2010

Another pensioner bashing!!!

I'm posting an email from Paul Marston of the WAMAIA.

--------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Paul Marston
Date: 19 February 2010 14:40
Subject: [WAMAIA] Another pensioner bashing!!!
To:



By now you have probably read that another pensioner, this time an 83 year old grandparent in Queens Park, Himet Etik, has been bashed, not by one man or one child, but by a group of more than ten, some of them reportedly armed with wooden stakes, his crime, BEING HOME WHEN HIS SON CONFRONTED TWO MEN TRYING TO STEAL HIS CAR FROM THE DRIVEWAY!

As is our custom with Local Victims of Crime, we will be raising funds toward his medical expenses and possibly assiting with an upgrade of his home security.

Any donations will be gratefully received at this office.

Thank you for your contribution.

Paul Marston Sensei
State President International Budo Federation
Convener West Australian Martial Arts Industry Association
Director KAPAP Academy WA
Director Australian Defensive Tactics Institute

38 years and still a student!!

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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

17 Feb 2010

Multiple Opponent Sparring Drill

Once upon a time in a land far far away, when I was a wee purple belt, I was taught fancy jump kicks to attack more than one target at the same time!!! Gone are those days. Multiple opponent training is a tough, gritty, and tiring affair. This video demonstrates a very practical way of introducing multiple opponent sparring training at the beginner level. A lot of the philosophy of my style deals with the use of an attacker as a shield against other attackers. It would be wise to incorporate such training into any martial arts curriculum.

Our multiple person sparring drill has some 'gaming' rules. Lately, we have not been using this as a sparring session due to the number of beginners. The drill has been however incorporated into our warmup sessions - and really maxes everyone out.

The game rules are simple. The person who is 'IT', needs to align the two or three others that are rushing him - 'IT' is allowed to grab. The people doing the rushing are trying to come at him from either side - and are not allowed to grab.

Multiple Person Sparring

Below is an example of a multiple opponent sparring session without tactical movement. Defender stands there and takes it like a man. There is an instance where he shows a surge toward the outside, and he does eventually take down his opponents. But by and large, he's right there in the middle slugging away.



Lastly, check out the excellent page on Facing Multiple Attackers by DefendU.

This post was mentioned on Striking Thoughts' Martial Art News 2.19.10.

For the continuation of this discussion, see Grabbing the Opponent and Using him as a Shield.

Cheers,

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

16 Feb 2010

Traditional Taekwondo on Jumping Kicks

Please look at my response to Potatoe Fist's post to get an understanding of the place of jumping kicks in our system.

Fist in the Frost: Jumping

I think the hip stretch and opening for long range standing kicks is a relatively good innovation by taekwondo. I think the extension of this relaxedness to jumping kicks is a sport-based detriment to real self defence.

Cheers.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

Chon-ji: Lower Punch to the Mid Section

How effective is the lower punch in the beginner's form Chon-ji? How do you apply it? What is the pull back hand doing?

Stackup for the punch
Landing the punch

punching to the body in chon-ji

Hope you enjoy it.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

15 Feb 2010

Note Taking in Martial Arts Classes

Just a Thought's Tuesday Tip: Take Notes

How many times have I asked students about a particular taekwondo technique only to be met with blank stares, and a "no we've not done it" response. Yet, the techniques were introduced and were part of belt requirements that have not changed in years. Then some point midway practicing, I'll get a confirmation that they're starting to remember the technique.

This blog was created end of 2008 to record notes for certain segments of my class. It provides instructor-side insight into the technique by providing more information or providing a different perspective not mentioned in class.

As I am no longer coaching national or sports representatives, the training journals kept by my students need not include competition preparation type training information. Journals however, should be used to capture techniques and tips for improvement. I typically offer personalised advice for each student whilst they learn or perfect a technique - all this should go into the training journal.

In my class there is no shortage of information. It seems only shortage of mental processes to retrieve information.

The training journal should also feature a practice schedule so that the student can practice skills required for the next grade. Any problems or issues should be noted and brought forward as part of the student's interaction with his/her taekwondo instructor.

I highly recommend students take a mature approach to managing their own path through traditioanl taekwondo. One of my pet peeves is to have to 'spoon feed' student practitioners.

Cheers!

Colin
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

13 Feb 2010

The HRGB Family Dinner



Can't seem to change the dimensions. Go check it out on the FB page by clicking on the about image. Thanks. Colin

ps. How come no one is wearing Taekwondo gear?
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Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Connect with Colin on FaceBook and Traditional Taekwondo Group on FB.

12 Feb 2010

Taekwondo Yop Marki Middle Block with a Vengeance



 This post discusses power generation for Taekwondo's middle block or yop marki.

Kyoshi Dr Bruce Clayton, author of Shotokan's Secret, has a parable posted on his forum about a self defence situation where defender is confronted with attackers and sees a baseball bat. If the immediate reaction is to reach for that bat as a weapon, what does this state about your karate?

The simple takeaway from that post is that karate or taekwondo techniques need to be able to generate significant amount of force when required. Furthermore, this power generation has to occur for even the most basic of techniques.

We were working on Taekwondo's yop marki or middle block last night. Without much thought to it, it is a technique which has questionable value. It is not a natural motion used for protection - the palm faces in rather than out which is typically how a person instinctively protects their upper body. However, like all basic techniques, this move does have its uses.

The stackup or the folding for Taekwondo's middle block creates a very complete cover of the upper body. The two elbows together form a very strong barrier against opponent's strikes. If need be, you can also reach down to cover lower abdomen or deflect groin strikes.

The middle block then allows for one of two very tactical responses to an aggressive force.
1. A well executed middle block allows you to continue the motion and capture the opponent's hand.
2. The end point of the middle block places your hand in a position to counter with a high level roundhouse punch or jab to the face.

My main point is that the middle block can generate a good amount of force. Not from the simple rotation of the shoulder cuff joint. The middle block applies force through the dropping of body weight. The circular upward movement draws the forearm into position. The proceeding locking of muscles of the upper body and core trunk, plus the dropping of centre of gravity then drops the entire body weight on the striking surface.

This generates a good amount of force which can be applied extended striking/grabbing arm or leg, shoulder or clavicle region, or back of neck.

Get it right and you will find that you don't need to overly use a lot of arm muscle to generate power. The entire body weight drops on the target allowing you to keep the arm more or less relaxed!

Cheers!

Colin

Why Go Headfirst into Attack?
Dan-gun: middle block drill
Chon-gi: Middle Block Drill with Partner
What Technique a Beginner Needs to Master

Cheers,

Colin
--
Colin Wee
Traditional Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]. Colin is a martial art instructor with 25 years of experience across three continents. Colin leads a small Traditional Taekwondo group for adults in Perth, Western Australia.

Join Colin on FaceBook.