Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

26 Apr 2009

Basai Double Punch Turn and Scoop Block as Throw Application

http://bunkaiblog.blogspot.com/2009/04/bassai-bunkai-hey-you-got-judo-in-my.html

This is an amazing application from Basai's double punch turn scoop block.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

Chon-ji Lower Block Against a a Kick

The beginners seem to need more drills and technique variations to understand the lower block or hardan marki. Aside from the regular defensive and offensive moves done against punches, today I pitted the lower block against a kick - effecting a takedown of the opponent.

The technique is not usually taught at this level, but it wasn't a major stretch for their current skills. The reverse or back hand covers against the striking kick and wraps under it from the outside of the leg. The low block strike puts downward striking pressure on the leg or pelvis and the block is down against the hip or support leg. A slight left twist in a nice low stance drops the opponent on the back.

To get to that position, the defender has to surge or gap close when the opponent starts his move. You have to fire your own muscles when the breath is exhaled and when the weight is shifted off the front or back leg.

THe arms are folded and provide coverage to most of your body. Your gap closing strategy needs to be done in a linear fashion in order for your body to shift towards your front leg and away from centreline. The back hand deflects the kick and wraps under it. You need to be close to the opponent for the technique to work. While your back hand wraps around the leg, your back fist should be close to the opponent's inner thigh. This allows you to open your hand and grab the relatively loose skin in the inner thigh - the hikite or pull back hand then controls this while the other hand goes to work.

The blocking hand can strike the leg as you enter either from the outside or downwards.

When you are throwing the opponent you are throwing the opponent off his base. Weighting him on his leg by bearing down with your lead hand allows you to stabilize his back leg on the ground. Twisting off to the outside then moves his COG up over his back leg and outside of his base. It's an easy throw.

Once on the floor you can apply an ankle lock or leg lock as you are comfortable. Or if not, stomp on the support knee or ankle.

Posts on Chon-ji
Pull Back Hand or Hikite
Chon-ji Downblock Drills

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

20 Apr 2009

Taekwondo Pattern Do-san: Nuts about Patterns

Do-san


Taekwondo pattern Do-san has an interesting pre-cursor move to the upper block as seen in the previous Taekwondo pattern Dan-gun. The chukyo marki or upper block is from a punch downwards in front of the groin. It's a good move - placed at the pattern which introduces the front kick. Anytime you have an area which causes extreme pain, you'd better be ready to put a hand or fist in front of it (and a little under). This is especially so if you're further opening it up to attack. It's wishful thinking that your opponent will avoid kicking your groin, especially since the groin is an easy low risk target. Colin

New listing of Taekwondo Do-san patterns on this blog

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

16 Apr 2009

Toi-gye: Manjiuke Step 28 - Left low block and right mid block to high section

We covered the fascinating 'Y' (or 'W' - whichever you see it) block from Taekwondo's Toi-gye as a way to deal with a kick and effect a takedown from the inside of his attack. Many times we see that within the one form you have other techniques to suggest how to deal with a specific attack from both sides. In this case we now look at what should happed if I step outside the kick. In comes Step 28 which starts off as what seems to be a palm strike and grab to the groin, with the other hand as an open palm guard to the neck. It then moves into a back stance with guarding hand dropping into a low block and the palm strike/grab becoming a mid block to upper section. This is called a mangiuke or a swastika block in karate (one hand down, one hand up - you can just imagine it in your mind). I'd take this as a leg grab or scoop that goes under a kick. The lift pulls the leg uncomfortably upwards - the lower block is done to the front of the person or to his groin. With the downward pressure from the low block, a little hip twist makes the person spin nicely around his support foot and drops him to the ground.

Links
Toi-gye List of Posts

Colin

Check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIYE5PS6MAo for an application of the 'W' block that greatly differs from what I've discussed above. It has some merit - so I'm not discounting it.
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

Taekwondo Pattern Toi-gye: Yamauke 'Y' Blocks Steps 13-18

Taekwondo Toi-gye


Taekwondo's Toi-gye pattern has the weirdest 'block' - the step 13-18 'Y' block. This is done in a horse stance with both hands held up, and I believe it is called a Yamauke in Karate. Recently in a historic Taekwondo DVD I hear commentary that the step forwards into each horse stance is there to augment the block - utter rubbish. It's rubbish because it isn't a block at all, but is there to teach you to capture a kick, and take down the opponent. One hand up allowing you to control the leg and the other hand slamming into the opponent's chest or controlling his body or blocking a reflexive upper body strike. The stomping horse stance leg technique can either be an upward strike or a sweep or a knee-to-knee strike. What is true is that in this position you don't have to do very much more than to twist a little and pivot the opponent around your own base to effect a take down. While I would suggest doing this technique against a long range, swinging or expansive roundhouse kick, it can be done against most kicks. Many kicks have a limited range of effectiveness. Once you've figured out the flight path and the most probably kick, a strong gap closing move will move you away from the effective striking zone of most kicks. Just don't move directly toward the foot -- and for goodness sakes, keep your hands up. In Taekwondo's Toi-gye, gap closing is done with one hand down and elbow sticking up - presumably to catch the kick on the forearm so you can pop the arm up under the leg. A very good tactic indeed. There is always more than meets the eye. I'm glad I've stuck around to figure it out. Colin

Links
Toi-gye list of posts

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

7 Apr 2009

Short Range and Close Quarter Taekwondo

I had a really good taekwondo training session last week. We had a small group looking at close quarter techniques from the pattern Do-san. Things like the vertical fist, centreline punching, trapping techniques, backfist, bong-sau, etc ... are more like techniques taken from a wing chun book rather than things you'd expect in a taekwondo class. But it's all there in the pattern, and I demonstrate it to show how the steps match with the applications and drills we've just been doing. "Oh..." was the reply I got from an associate who's been trained previously at an ITF school, "I was taught that move as a long range backfist." Then adding "that other technique was taught with the guarding hand done closer, rather than allowing me to put forward pressure on the opponent." The end result? No, you can't ask for your money back in those situations. Taekwondo's Do-san is an integral part of the beginner syllabus, it rounds off and completes the range of beginner skills which allow the practitioner to effectively strike long distance, gap close, deal with the opponent and bring him down to the ground. But gap closing means fighting up close, and therefore needs the student to come really close to the opponent. Replicate the distance used in the dojo exercises and you will be really effective when you pull those magic bullets learned in taekwondo's Do-san.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]