Training Warriors for the 21st Century

Training Warriors for the 21st Century
Joong Do Kwan Traditional Taekwondo cross training with Kidokwan Perth

29 Mar 2009

Protecting our selves from our "selves": Take a deep breath ( Part 3) by Mireille Clark

In Part 1 I spoke about how we need to defend from inner psychological stress that can stop us from performing during a crisis situation. In Part 2 I explained how our Martial Arts training can help us use our breathing beneficially. Today, I would like to support these ideas with various websites, articles, and videos that I have dug up out of the internet.

In more than one study done on Deep breathing, doctors have seen that people were able to lower their blood pressure by sometimes as much as 10 to 15 points. It was such a significant difference, that the Japanese study did recommend that patients in an office should not be encouraged to do deep breathing before having their blood pressure checked. It seems that deep breathing may actually change how the kidneys remove salt from the body.

" When under chronic stress, people tend to take shallow breaths and unconsciously hold them, what Anderson calls inhibitory breathing. Holding a breath diverts more blood to the brain to increase alertness — good if the boss is yelling — but it knocks off kilter the blood's chemical balance. More acidic blood in turn makes the kidneys less efficient at pumping out sodium.

In animals, Anderson's experiments have shown that inhibitory breathing delays salt excretion enough to raise blood pressure. Now he's testing if better breathing helps people reverse that effect."


BlackDice572 (Just click on his name to see his video.)has offered a wonderful informative relaxed video on Youtube filled with explanation on the mechanics of breathing, and how it supports our training. In his video, he mentions the "Fascia Train theory". If you would like to learn more about this, feel free to visit this website.

Mr Aaron Hoopes from Australia offers an in depth article explaining various deep breathing exercises in a convenient understandable step by step manner. As he explains some exercises take years to learn, while others are quite easy. All are beneficial.

Sensei Derdeyn offers a comprehensive, well made, and fact-filled series of Aikido Breathing instructional videos on www.expertvillage.com. He gives the history of combat breathing, and ties it into modern athletic sports as weight lifting, football, etc.



http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14122841/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16231755


--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

27 Mar 2009

Like being hit by a bullet

That was how it was when I punched the white belt holding the striking mitt to her side. It was like she was shot. This was by a short range reverse snap punch at a distance of about 30 cm away from the target. No she didn't fly backwards, but there was obvious penetration, hydrostatic shock, and the appropriate recoil, coughing and deep breathing to recover from the strike.

The next time I did the same punch however, the orange belt holding the target was much larger - probably outweighing me by 20 UGLY kilograms and taller by about half a foot or so. The effect was less noticeable. I didn't change the technique so indeed I would have been hitting him with the same force - not 100%, but still significant.

It was commented that he withstood 5 of the strikes I initially used on the white belt ... which leaves me to talk about what martial arts is and is not.

Firstly, martial arts does not have any magic bullets. Ikken Hisatsu or similar concepts are not techniques to just snap your fingers with and opponents drop like flies. All basic techniques use pure physics to improve on yourself. It's up to 100% ... not any more.

Also for those martial artists out there who think that martial arts level the playing field - there are opponents out there that will pose differing levels of threat. Different strengths, speed, pain thresholds, experience, weapons usage ... all these add to the risks you face. Underestimate them and you might as well zip up that bodybag around yourself.

Keep safe. Keep it real.

Get More Striking Power Through Traditional Taekwondo

--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

21 Mar 2009

Self Defense Reality Check

My wife who's a radiologist recounted to me a story related to a scan in which she recently saw. It involved a police officer attempting to either arrest or write up a citation for a drunk person, whereupon the drunk grabbed the officer's pen, jammed it into his eye socket, and pushed his head, pen first against the police officer's chest -- shoving it deeper into his head. The pen entered into the corner of the eye, and the scan showed the full length of it in the man's skull. It however missed all major structures and there was little damage done! Something to think about when dealing with dumb opponents with an increased pain tolerance related to alcohol or drug abuse. Colin

Taekwondo and Self Defence

--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

16 Mar 2009

Taekwondo's Close Quarter Punches ... say again?

From my observation, there are few if any hard style karate or taekwondo schools that teach a close quarter centreline vertical fist punch ala Wing Chun, Isshinryu or Savate's piston punches. Yet basics for close quarter techniques are right there in Do-san, the third form we have ... which features forward facing backfists and spearhand done with a horizontal open hand trapping technique. This kind of close quarter punch is related to the discussion of punching life-cycle -- any point along the punching line is a legitimate strike irrespective of the rotation of the fist. In fact it is acceptable to even strike with the forearm whilst punching or create havoc by recoiling the punch and making contact with the thumb-knuckle to the neck or other sensitive regions. Inclusion of such training allows the student to deal with opponents in the short range, and more importantly skills them up to deal with opponents that jab iteratively or who attack at melee range without the 'standard' step forward with entire body.

--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

13 Mar 2009

75 Down Blocks

I'm just now wading through the 75 Down Blocks by Rick Clark book attempting to look for the technique I thought I extracted and used as a drill in my class last night. But you know what? While I thought it was a technique pulled out of the book, it was only part of the technique modified and similar to the Traditional Taekwondo drills we already did in our class.

We're using a down block to deal with an opposite side push or punch. The opposite or folding hand goes under the attacker's outstretched arm as a reverse snap punch. The fold for the block deflects and controls attacker's extended arm. There's no magic here - no fiddly jujutsu move.

It's a straight hip rotation striking the opponent's lower ribs with some good force. Then rotate the other way and drive folded blocking elbow into the opponent's solar plexus. Pull the opponent's arm, extend the blocking arm and perform the lower block to the back of the opponent's neck. Change the first formation in order to strike the back of the neck with the corners of the fist.

Chon-ji Downblock Drills
Taekwondo Cancelled. Holidays Anyway?

Colin
--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

10 Mar 2009

Taekwondo had to be Cancelled. Holidays anyone?

I was off interstate again with my wife who was on conference. Had to cancel two of my classes, but am ready to start again this Thursday. If anyone is interested, let me tell you I totally enjoyed Sydney and the Hunter Valley.

Managed to pick up '75 down blocks' by Rick Clark. It's an interesting book and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the worth of traditional style practices.

Where I disagree with the approach to accumulating this rich material for one specific technique is in the teaching or transmission of this information. Many instructors seem adamant to do as much as possible for each and every stage, and expect equally as much from themselves as well as their students. For me, my goals are far more honest and humble. Each stage or belt rank is a progression for beginners through the arts - to ensure they arrive at shodan ready to do some real learning.

Students who have gone through my program seem able to remember and recollect those aspects of their rank training that I have intended they should remember ... and are able to build up on those basic skills nicely. (See 'You're expecting too much from them, Colin')

Of course I approach training in one specific way and am happy with the way it's progressing. I urge other instructors to look at being real with their expectations and developing a programme suited for their style and needs.

75 Down Blocks: Refining Karate Technique (Google Scholar)
Karate Underground Discussion on 75 'Downward' Blocks

Colin

--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]