Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

27 Feb 2009

Taekwondo Students and Their Training logs

Training logs are a diary to capture training sessions and progress. They help the student practitioner figure out how to improve on areas of weakness and to give a student the perspective of how to maintain good performance. I am happy to say that one of my students has started his training log online at Christian's TKD Journey. Happy reading and training. Colin

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

15 Feb 2009

Taekwondo Grading - Adding Layers Upon Layers of Knowledge

Today I had a grading for our resident yellow belt.

When I sprung the start of the grading on him, you could see he was sweating from the warmup/workout, and from the heat and humidity of the morning.

What was I looking for? I was looking for slavish focus and a demonstration of technique understanding driven by the taekwondo pattern Dan-gun. All techniques and all defences should be driven with the framework that Dan-gun provided. This is part of the study, is it not?

So if I ask for a particular defence or application to be performed and that technique is featured as well in the previous grading, what version would I like demonstrated for this specific grading? Yes, it is the version that was recently taught.

This is how a structured Taekwondo syllabus adds layers to existing knowledge and pulls the student along. It also allows the student to use the structure of the patterns as a benchmark for future knowledge and introspection. My hope is that the student would continue to think about the lessons and add to their framework as they continue - with or without me.

See other posts of mine on Taekwondo Grading.

Colin

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

13 Feb 2009

Traditional Taekwondo Fee Schedule

Idea copied from ... Karate Thoughts Blog: Rank Fee Schedule - I have listed my fee schedule as below.

Traditional Taekwondo Fee Schedule
  • Testing Fee:
  • Belt Fee:
  • Certificate Fee:
  • Annual Renewal Fee:
  • Retesting Fee:
  • Reissuance of Lost Certificate Fee:
  • Recertification Fee:
  • Title Fee:
  • Fee to Have Certificate Signed by Dignitary:
  • Fee to Have Photo Taken With Dignitary Awarding Certificate:

Similar to Charles Goodin's original post, you don't see any fee information because we don't charge anything for training. We were once a commercial operation, and I am happy to say that we offered a respected and appreciated service offering. Now we are a 'social group,' and our charges are non-financial.

I would suggest however that a form of payment still does apply to the martial art student. Payment includes pain tolerance, endurance, patience, commitment, loyalty, enthusiasm, investment of time, focus, curiosity, and dedication. If students can't meet this level of expectation I am happy for them not to show up for class so that the real business of martial arts training can continue in earnest - with students who understand the value of Traditional Taekwondo training.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

11 Feb 2009

GM Keith D. Yates Now on Facebook

Head of American Karate and Taekwondo Organization, GM Keith D Yates, 10 Dan, is now on Facebook. A notable author, martial art historian, long time instructor and all-round nice guy, Mr Yates' pre-AKaTo organisation 'Southwest Taekwondo Association' was where I got some *real* training. I am indebted to him, his students, and his continuing leadership. Colin

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

Traditional Taekwondo Training - Thought of the Moment

If you train for high kicks, you'll mostly get good at high kicks.
If you train for low kicks, you'll mostly get good at low kicks.
Don't expect to be good at low kicks if you always do high kicks.

Likewise ...

If you train to hit a kick shield, you'll mostly get good at hitting that equipment.
If you train to hit a person standing in front of you, you'll mostly get good at hitting that kind of opponent..
Don't expect to get good at dealing with an opponent if you just kick that kick shield mindlessly.

Colin
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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

1 Feb 2009

Taekwondo Blocks Hard and Blocks Soft

At Taekwondo class today, I was instructing my student to perform an upper 'age uke' or 'chukyo marki' block followed immediately by a down block with the same hand. What I saw was two powerful blocks done technically well and with good deliberation for his belt rank.

I stopped him to explain what I really wanted.

The first up block is to be done with lots of good commitment - it is preemptive, aggressive, and is as much a strike as it is a defence against an attack from the opponent. This is the type of block that needs to be done before you see the technique coming at you! The second however is done because you've recognised that you've just 'missed' the oncoming strike. Probably your opponent changed striking angles or has just pulled a knife or weapon out. There is little time to wind up and power through the arm - you need to retract slightly, pull the arm down and very quickly deflect the oncoming strike. There is no need to destroy the arm - so long as you don't get poked in the ribs with some pen or knife. The second move is done quickly and requires your arm to be flexible - the fulcrum is no longer the shoulder (as you generate power from the body), but is closer to the elbow or forearm. This allows the move to retract quicker from full extension and still be deployed with good effect.

Try this at home - perform one block, hold it there and swing it into another block with the same hand. Put lots of power into the second technique and you'll never get enough speed to match a dedicated strike.

Regards, Colin

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]