Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends in Perth

24 Dec 2008

Patrick McCarthy Interview on Kata, Bunkai and Martial Training

MAV Interviews Patrick McCarthy

Excellent interview featuring Patrick McCarthy's kata theories, approach to training, and ideas of bunkai. Great inspirational section right at the end talking about martial arts philosophy. It's about 30 minutes long but I highly recommend you watch the video.

Merry Christmas!

Colin

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Colin Wee
Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
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23 Dec 2008

Taekwondo v Raw Beginners

In front of me stood a beginner. She's not even wearing a martial arts uniform - coming instead in quite trendy good-looking exercise gear. She is shorter than I am, but quite coordinated, athletic, and strong.

My arms are smarting and I feel quite alert. The sparse instruction I have provided is for her to surge forward, pretend like she has a knife, and to stab me good and proper. Well at least that's the instruction I communicated when she was facing off my other Taekwondo student - a yellow belt.

The response was to stop the downward slash with a same-side upper block and to quickly follow-up with another upper block either to the arm, or to the elbow, or to the neck. My other beginner faced a huge level of difficulty - she was more than a foot shorter than he was and was managing very well to stab him "good and proper". Basically his technique was failing him.

So yes, that left me standing in front of the beginner and making me apply my basic technique to an untrained attacker. She was trying to stab me hard, and when other students would reduce their strength when I stopped the blow, she would add more body weight to see if I was adequately dealing with her stabbing motion.

I am of course confident with the technique and the application, but whilst it would be totally easy with the others who have trained in martial arts, there was a good and healthy level of challenge to apply the technique correctly, time it well, and to make sure proper body dynamics and muscle tension was present in order not to get overwhelmed by a changing and changeable strike.

Taekwondo tips for beginners in dealing with random attacks

1. Respond when you see the attacker moving - not when the strike is about to kill you.
2. Make your block or strike BLOCK the attack. Just performing the technique like I said may not be the best for you.
3. All basic skills like relaxedness first and then focused tension at the end works - tense up first and you slow yourself down.
4. Sometimes it is to your benefit to step off the line!
5. Meet the aggression with your own aggression.

This kind of randomness is highly valuable for Traditional Taekwondo training. If you haven't already had this opportunity I highly recommend you pass around raw beginners amongst your ranks in order for people to face off attackers who are determined to do 'you' rather than a specific 'something'! Both my other student and myself felt it was one of the best training sessions we had in a few weeks.

Beginning Taekwondo Links

Colin

--
Colin Wee
Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
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The Year End Thank You Message from HRGB

Bob from Striking Thoughts just posted 'What Inspires Me,' which has in turn inspired me to post my gratitude to those who have inspired me and my martial arts research and development this year. This list is not in any particular order.

Keith Yates from A-KaTo
Michael Proctor and Tony Tempesta from Renbudo Karate
Dan Djurdjevic and the Wu Wei Dao clan
Bob from Striking Thoughts
Pat from Mokuren Dojo
Nat from TDA Training
Stuart Anslow from Rayners Lane TKD

I would also like to extend my gratitude to the current students of Hikarudojo. They put up with the difficult yet sometimes sporadic training yet keep coming back for more (those who are in town at least). I appreciate your sharing my enthusiasm for Traditional Taekwondo. My group for 2008 consists of - Jacob, Jacqui, Christian, and Nicole.

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

16 Dec 2008

Ten Rules for Opening a Martial Arts School

This is a response to Dan's 10 Rules for Opening a Martial Arts School post.

10. When I started my school I had a framework for a traditional taekwondo system which I thought needed to be fleshed out. I wasn't trying to come up with my own system. I wanted a program that would help beginners through the training, and come up with some standard and consistency. I didn't want to have to think about the system again and again, so I made sure to write down everything and draw my sequences out. Now I've got a fantastic program that helps me teach others. My advice is to do your homework and prepare instructor notes or a program that will make your job easier in the long run.

9. In a previous life, I spent years and years as a national representative in another sport and years and years coaching other people from club level to national level. Any martial arts instructor should do some research into sports science or psychology or coaching in order to understand what makes an instructor and what makes a good coach. I would also seek to rope in at least two other senior students or assistant instructors at least - so you've got some backup in class or if you can't make it because of other commitments.

8. When I grade my adult students I am not obliged to pass any of them. Mostly white belts pass to yellow belts. But unless you do sufficiently well during the grade, the grading is only going to be a coaching and feedback session, and in the end .. you might receive a retained-in-current-grade result. I have never regretted this failing of people. I have however regretted passing people. This is something to ponder as a martial arts owner -- your students will reflect you. So teach them less techniques. Teach them better. Drill them more. And make sure your expectations are clear. Make your gradings fair to help promote quality, but don't compromise. Note - I don't teach children classes. This approach might not work for young children.

7. Make time for your own traditional taekwondo training. Get all consumed to provide good training and you might forget yourself. Make sure to work in with your students. They will benefit from your experience. This keeps you in shape and helps you learn how to deal with non-trained opponents and opponents who are taller or shorter. Make sure you warm up before you strain yourself - or you'll injure yourself easily. Keep mixing things up to keep classes fun.

6. Revenue - when I started a commercial operation I kept my martial arts group small and catered to organisational clients. Each half day or lunchtime gig I sold was fantastic revenue. If I had a regular martial arts class I would have had to work like a dog to get the same dollars. The lesson here is that there are different ways to earn money yet provide a high level of satisfaction for your students and yourself. Open yourself up to organisational courses, birthday parties, public speaking, motivational courses, etc. I saw myself as a broker for other martial arts instructors. Can you believe that? I would help other martial arts instructors earn money for commissions. Now who would think of such a cooperative? If you open up a school, this is what you've got to do, think as a business owner and expand your pie first.

5. I have derived great satisfaction from the number of martial arts friends I have. From previous experience, martial arts practitioners are difficult people and I tend to stay well away from them. But I have now changed my mind. There are those martial arts practitioners out there who are beyond self-indulgence, ego, and arrogance. I personally have met a good number of them and I am proud to call them my friends. You can too. Take the first step and be friendly. Network! It doesn't hurt to meet people who share the same interest as you. (Stay away from the a**holes.)

4. Martial arts training changes a person. Pushing students to the limit and giving them newfound skills strengthens them. These people draw inspiration from you beyond the physical lessons you provide. Recognize this and don't be afraid of pushing your students to reach out to their potential. Share your passion. Guide them correctly. Even knowing that you have made a difference to one student's life will be a profound revelation to the martial arts instructor.

3. The IAOMAS or International Alliance of Martial Arts Schools is a non-profit student support organisation that helps instructors and supports travelling students. Reach out to them and join in like-minded instructors who are confident in themselves to allow students who travel the ability to train at 600+ locations worldwide.

2. Quality, quality, quality. How do you provide maintain and improve a quality service? This question begs to be asked again and again. How do you maintain standards? Improve on service delivery? Evaluation methods? Consistency of results? Customer satisfaction? Knowledge retention? Grow human resources? You are a service provider ... time to act like one and manage indices that can be used to measure your worth!

1. Don't be afraid to grow with your students.


--
Colin Wee
Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
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11 Dec 2008

Human Weapon On Taekwondo

Bill Duff, one of the presenters of Human Weapon gets knocked out during a sparring match on the Taekwondo episode.



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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

9 Dec 2008

Power Generation through Kime or Focus

This is a post I made on the Traditional Fighting Arts forum that I thought I should cross-post on this blog.

***begin***

Kime. I've never seen the kanji nor have I read up on the meaning. I know the concept as being associated with the 'focus' for strikes typically like the one you see in an oizuke or reverse snap punch.

The concept that I communicate in my Taekwondo class is described by muscle lock down at the point of impact and just beyond in order to transmit greater force by increasing the mass associated with the weapon. It's the F=MA equation. For some strikes, like penetrative or thrusting motions, a systemic contraction of the entire body can link the striking tool to the greater mass of the human body, the body's inertia, or to the ground. It does not typically relate to swinging or whipping moves as those derive power mostly from the 'A' in F=MA.

Muscle lock down for a traditionally performed front lunge punch or oizuke is easy. Muscle lock down for a oizuke done with back foot off the ground is more difficult, but it is possible. This is so long as the arm is rotated in order for the lats to lock down the arm to the moving body, and for the muscle to allow the structure of the arm to be driven by the mass of the body core.

This is like jousting. The knight will grip the lance with his lats. He will grip the horse with his legs. Before the strike he will lean forward. Shoulder position could be slightly forward or it could be square - doesn't matter too much. Upon impact he will brace his body.

The lance, the knight, and the horse all become one unit.

This is kime.

It would not work if his arm is held loosely at his side or if he thinks the strength of his shoulder (from shoulder rotation) will knock the other knight off.

Links




--
Colin Wee
Joong Do Kwan Chung Sah Nim
[Traditional Taekwondo Blog | Subscribe | FAQs | Sitemap | FaceBook]
And help us rank on Google by clicking the '+1' icon, why don't you?
How much do you know of Taekwondo? Come take our Taekwondo quiz to find out.

4 Dec 2008

Martial Arts Against Martial Arts (The Best Blog Post)

Bob at Striking Thoughts posted Reality Martial Arts, one of the best blog posts I've read on how different styles of martial arts stack up against each other. It's Muay Thai v Taekwondo v Karate v Streetfight v Grappling v Chimps v Pimps. I love the videos he's consolidated from Youtube and also his summary of points as he presents a takeaway lesson for the rest of us who've been too lazy to do this kind of work. :-) You get best post of the quarter, Bob! I highly recommend everyone visit to take a look. Colin

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

3 Dec 2008

Do-san: Step 6 & 7 as Hip Throw

Mokuren Dojo has a post to describe the hip throw we learn for Taekwondo's Do-san 7th Kyu 'Seoinage is Not Crack of Butt Throw.' We do this technique as a butt crack throw, but have the luxury of not thinking too much about it! :-)

As an overview, step 6 is a right spearhand or nukite with left guarding. Step 7 is a left 360 degree turn into a left backfist. This is interpreted in a number of ways, but the 'official' or most common interpretation is as a 'Judo' hip throw. I also teach it as a choke/takedown with the added movement of the turn introducing a strike the side of the neck with a ridge hand.

Oldman has a diagram depicting Step 6 & 7 in the 'official' interpretation - that of the turn as a release from a handlock. Oldman's Boobishi: Bunkai Pinan Sandan



Do-san Hip Throw
Taekwondo Do-san Pattern List of Posts

Colin

--
Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]

2 Dec 2008

Dan-gun: Is a Block Just a Block?

I though to highlight a recent response from my friend Dan in my post Dan-gun: Applying the Up Block as a Taekwondo Technique. I think there is always the chance that a beginner or intermediate student might dismiss the first few lessons or techniques they learn because they think that a basic technique might not have the efficiacy or lethality necessary in the martial arts. This mindset is wrong. Every bit of your martial arts, karate or taekwondo program is useful dependant on how you apply those techniques to accomplish certain goals. I have personally seen basic techniques blossom after practicing them over 25 years. It's really a testimony to how much you can get from the martial arts irrespective of your age. (see Keeping on the Path of Traditional Taekwondo

Dan Djurdjevic said...
Funnily enough, just last night we were doing a lot of sparring and I wondered which block I used most frequently. I took careful note of what I was doing and found that the upper block was by far the most useful!!!

Colin Wee said...
I was in a tough dojo once upon a time and neck deep sparring this one training partner, a real battler. He was close to knocking me out with a spinning backfist - 'close' in that if I had left my guarding hand next to my head, the backfist would probably have penetrated through that meager defence. Luckily, I decided to put an up block there ... which stopped the backfist cold. It was then I realised that I had been using a variation of the up block to cover the front (similar to the basic technique) as well as the side of the head (a little like a vertical elbow). Previous to that I had always dismissed the technique as only the 'prescribed' method of blocking someone stabbing downwards with a knife -- which isn't a very good basic application at all. Nowadays the up block has taken on a whole different level of lethality for me. It's turned out to be a good little block after all. :-) Colin

Dan on Control v Missing - check out his amazing video on the upper block

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Colin Wee
Taekwondo Techniques, Patterns, and Applications at the Traditional Taekwondo Blog. [Subscribe using email or RSS feeds] [Tkd Sitemap]