Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications

Joong Do Kwan's Taekwondo Applications
JDK Instructors share the passion with ITF friends here in Perth

18 Jun 2007

Taekwondo Do san: Spearhand + Open Palm Block

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Sonia the blue belt circa 2004 - sorry I forgot to resize the photo.

From left shuto in back balance, step forward blocking downward with left open palm and chamber spearhand at side of ribs. Complete the technique by striking out with spearhand to throat.

It's easy with Jacob, who stands at about 5'4". His punch comes and is easily deflected with the downward horizontal open palm block. I strike him easily with the spearhand - right next to the adam's apple and right on the carotid artery. My fingers are slightly cupped and the middle finger is supported by 1 and 3.

Pieter at 6'6" is a different story. His punch comes hard and powerful. I have to focus on striking his punch with my horizontal forearm, it becomes less of a deflection than a strike with 'kime' or striking focus. The spear hand is angled up quite severely.

We continue the technique by stepping into the opponent, bringing our hips toward the back of his hips. During, I add in another ridge hand strike to the left side of opponent's neck. Then pushing my arm deep, I clasp my right fist and bend the opponent backward.

At 5'7", after I strike Pieter's neck, I had to hop up and drag Pieter backwards. This is similar to kokyunage done in Aikido - you use your whole bodyweight to pull the opponent down.

Links



Colin

Related Taekwondo Do san pattern links
Rayners Lane Chang Hon Seminar feturing Do-san
Practical Martial Arts
Do-san at TMAC Forum
Do -san at TKD Tutor

2 comments:

Silverstar said...

Hi,
Nice pic!
I'm learning a similar type of strike in Ju Jutsu. :)

Colin Wee said...

Care to tell us about it?

The last session we practiced this nukite strike against a front kick no less. The movement after the strike requires a 180 degree turn to the left spinning on the ball of the right foot. The striking hand is dropped, wrapped around the back of the body for a bit and then pulled into hikite (or chambered). This dropping motion plus the turn allows us to deflect a front kick using the top of the forearm. The elbow points towards the opponent and the kick is deflected to the left side of your body. It doesn't take a lot to send a kick off course.

Colin